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Julie, Zach Ertz share what they learned from each other’s sports

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As Julie Ertz prepares for an Olympic year, and her husband a potential NFL playoff run, each can draw on the other’s experiences at the pinnacle of their sports.

Ertz and husband Zach, a Philadelphia Eagles tight end, discussed swapping training ideas, among other topics, on The Peter King Podcast.

The full 53-minute episode is here.

Ertz said she has grown to love watching match film after seeing Zach’s passion for studying.

“How important it is to pay attention to detail, even through route running,” she said on the podcast. “If somebody’s in the wrong spot, the whole play is kind of messed up. Every play is different, and in soccer it’s obviously a little bit more fluid, but it allowed me to stay more aware of where I am on the field.”

Zach said he was driven by training with Ertz, especially through core work. They’ve done yoga and Pilates together. Mentally, he can appreciate an athlete who trains for one or two major events every four years.

“The World Cup and the Olympics are what you’re going to be judged on as a player in her sport … it’s twice every four years, and so those two years you don’t have a quote-unquote big tournament, you can let your preparation lack if you really weren’t dedicated, if you weren’t fully invested,” he said. “But the way I see Julie train each and every day, she’s always training to be the best person she can be. She’s not training for the end result. She’s training for being a better player today than she was yesterday.”

Ertz, 27 and the 2017 U.S. Player of the Year, was part of World Cup title teams in 2015 and this past summer, but she doesn’t have an Olympic medal.

The U.S. was upset by Sweden in the quarterfinals in Rio. Ertz kept a photo from the match as a screen saver on her phone as a reminder of unfinished business.

“It was a horrible heartbreak that I’d never had before,” she said.

MORE: Rio Olympic women’s soccer champions fail to qualify for Tokyo

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Marquise Goodwin serious about NFL to Olympics run

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Marquise Goodwin, the San Francisco 49ers wide receiver, insists he wasn’t kidding when he proclaimed in April that he would win the 2020 Olympic long jump.

“Yes, 100 percent interest,” Goodwin said Tuesday. “But we’re talking about football right now. 2020 next year.”

Goodwin is already an Olympian, finishing 10th in the long jump at the 2012 London Games before his last season at the University of Texas. After two seasons with the Buffalo Bills, Goodwin went back to the track and failed in a Rio Olympic bid even though he had the world’s two farthest jumps that year going into the U.S. Olympic Trials.

Goodwin said he had “ceased competing” in track and field when he was suspended one year from April 1, 2017, for not updating drug-testing whereabouts forms. Goodwin stopped filling out the forms after going back to the NFL in 2016.

But now, at 28, he could look to become the oldest U.S. man to compete in an Olympic long jump since Carl Lewis won his record fourth straight gold at the 1996 Atlanta Games. His best long jump in 2016 — 8.45 meters — would rank first among Americans in this Olympic cycle.

However, Goodwin did not provide specifics Tuesday on when he would return to competition.

“It’s just offseason, same way I did it in high school, college, NFL,” he said. “Just make it happen. It’s all on my off time. I use it as part of my training. What I do in long jump, in track and field, definitely correlates with what I do as a wide receiver with being fast, being explosive, putting my foot down. It’s the same mechanics that I use in football.”

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MORE: Olympic shot put champion turned down NFL tryout

Watch Colin Kaepernick introduce Tommie Smith, John Carlos at USATF Night of Legends

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Twenty-four members of the 1968 U.S. Olympic track and field team appeared at the USATF Night of Legends. Two in particular received a standing ovation before an award presentation.

Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who earned 200m gold and bronze medals and then raised their black-gloved fists on the medal stand, were introduced via video by quarterback Colin Kaepernick, a fellow athlete fighting for social justice.

“Fifty years ago, these two men shook the world,” Kaepernick said in the video. “Their selfless and courageous act had an impact on the heart and mind of millions and have been a huge inspiration to me, personally. They laid the foundation not only for what the conscience of an athlete should look like, but also the world.”

Smith and Carlos then walked on stage at the Night of Legends, which honored the top U.S. athletes and performances of 2018, along with Hall of Fame inductees. NBCSN will air the event on Saturday at 11 p.m. ET.

They presented the Jesse Owens Award, which goes annually to the top U.S. male athlete. Fellow 200m sprinter Noah Lyles earned the honor.

“If he would give you and I a two-day head start, I think we could beat him in the 200m,” Carlos joked to Smith. “We’ve got to lean,” Smith replied.

Lyles, 21, joined Usain Bolt as the only men to break 19.7 seconds in the 200m four times in one year. His best time — 19.65 — was the world’s fastest since Bolt’s last world title in 2015. Lyles also became the youngest U.S. men’s 100m champion in 34 years. He’s the second-youngest person to earn USATF Athlete of the Year after Allyson Felix.

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MORE: John Carlos, Tommie Smith remember 1968 Olympics on 50th anniversary