Relive Greg Louganis’ diving board accident on 30th anniversary

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Before the 1996 Olympics, an international panel of journalists selected one outstanding Olympian from each previous Summer Games.

Greg Louganis was chosen from Seoul 1988.

Wednesday marks 30 years since Louganis smacked his head on the springboard in the preliminary round of those Olympics, though he still qualified for the next day’s final and earned gold.

“After hitting my head on the springboard, I was really scared,” Louganis said in an NBC interview at prelims, after receiving four stitches and performing two more dives. “My concern was I didn’t know how bad the injury was. Fortunately, it was just a minor cut. … Those kinds of things are bad to look at [laugh].”

That wasn’t the whole story.

Louganis revealed seven years later, after retiring, that he had been HIV positive at the time of the Seoul Olympics.

His coach, Ron O’Brien, one of the few who knew, smuggled the medication into Seoul, Louganis said, because he wouldn’t have been allowed in if it was known he was HIV positive.

Louganis revisited the incident for an NBC profile ahead of the 1996 Atlanta Games.

“I heard this big, hollow thud, and then I went crashing into the water,” Louganis said. “Then I realized that was my head that just hit the board. My first feelings were embarrassment, and I was trying to figure out how to get out of the pool without anybody seeing me. And then I got scared because I knew I was HIV positive. Had I done it all over again, I would have told the doctor of my HIV status. That’s the only person that really needed to know.”

Louganis remains one of just two divers to sweep the springboard and platform at multiple Olympics, along with countrywoman Pat McCormick.

NBC Olympic Research contributed to this report.

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Eliud Kipchoge chases world record at Berlin Marathon; how to watch

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Eliud Kipchoge insists, again, it’s not his goal, but he takes another crack at the world record at the Berlin Marathon, live on NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold on Sunday.

NBC Sports Gold coverage starts at 2:30 a.m. ET for subscribers, with NBCSN broadcast and streaming coverage at 3.

“I just want to run my personal best, which stands at 2:03:05,” Kipchoge said Tuesday, according to Reuters, his typical pre-race mindset. “If a world record also happens, that will be good enough.”

Kipchoge, the 33-year-old Olympic champion from Kenya, is expected to challenge the 26.2-mile record of 2:02:57, set by countryman Dennis Kimetto at the 2014 Berlin Marathon.

“Eliud is going there to run for a world record,” countryman and pacer Sammy Kitwara said, according to Reuters. “He is hoping to run a world record of 2:02:40 or thereabouts.”

Kipchoge has come close to the world record in Berlin before.

In 2015, Kipchoge ran 2:04:00 to win with his soles flapping out from the backs of his shoes.

In 2017, Kipchoge won Berlin in 2:03:32, surely slowed by the weather — rain and humidity on the pancake-flat roads of the German capital.

In 2016, Kipchoge clocked his personal-best marathon of 2:03:05 in London, which makes him the third-fastest marathoner ever after Kimetto and Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele (2:03:03).

But Kipchoge may be best known for clocking 2:00:25 in Nike’s sub-two-hour marathon attempt in May 2017 on a Formula 1 race track in Italy. The time wasn’t record-eligible, however, as Kipchoge had the benefit of pacers shuffling in and out and drinks being given to runners via mopeds.

Not counting the breaking-two attempt, Kipchoge has won eight straight marathons, which is the longest streak at the highest level of the event in at least 50 years. Other legends Abebe Bikila and Haile Gebrselassie‘s streaks topped out at six.

Though Kipchoge is a veteran, he may still be in his marathon prime at age 33 and in his 11th go at the distance.

Gebrselassie’s fastest marathon came at age 35 (in his ninth marathon); Bekele at 34 (in his fourth marathon) and Wilson Kipsang (the only man to break 2:04 four times) at 34 (in his 16th marathon).

Then there’s the course. The last six times the marathon world record was lowered, it happened in Berlin. Seven of the eight fastest times in history (on record-eligible courses) were recorded in Berlin in the last seven years.

Kipchoge would likely benefit from other fast runners pushing him. That could come in the form of Kipsang and Eritrean Zersenay Tadese, the half-marathon world-record holder, both in Sunday’s field.

Top U.S. marathoner Galen Rupp and four-time Olympic track champion Mo Farah are slated for the Chicago Marathon on Oct. 7. Kenyan Geoffrey Kamworor defends his New York City Marathon title Nov. 4.

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Larry Probst, USOC chairman, to step down

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USOC chairman Larry Probst will step down from the board at the end of the year after 10 years as chair, succeeded by independent board member Susanne Lyons, the USOC acting CEO earlier this year.

“Serving as chairman of the USOC board of directors has been an extraordinary honor and I’m proud of the work we did during my tenure to support American athletes, and advance the Olympic and Paralympic movements,” Probst said in a press release. “I became chairman at a difficult time for the USOC and worked diligently with my colleagues here in the U.S., and around the world, to change the USOC for the better. It’s now time for a new generation of leaders to confront the challenges facing the organization and I have the utmost confidence in Susanne’s and Sarah’s ability to do just that.”

Probst was first elected chairman in 2008, then reelected in 2012 and 2016.

Probst, whose IOC membership is tied to his USOC role, said he will meet with IOC president Thomas Bach later this month as he looks for ways he may stay involved in the Olympic Movement.

Lyons was acting CEO from Feb. 28-Aug. 20, replacing Scott Blackmun, until Sarah Hirshland took over as permanent CEO.

Blackmun stepped down after eight years as CEO in February, citing difficulties with prostate cancer and the federation’s need to urgently move forward to address the sex abuse scandal that has rocked gymnastics.

Lyons was first elected to the board in December 2010 and will serve a four-year term as chair starting Jan. 1.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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