Christian Coleman edges Ronnie Baker, Noah Lyles in Rabat 100m

Leave a comment

Who is currently the world’s fastest man? Christian Coleman staked another claim Friday, but just barely.

Coleman won a Diamond League 100m in Rabat in 9.98 seconds, edging countrymen Ronnie Baker by .006 and Noah Lyles by .01 into a slight headwind. The field included the world’s four fastest men since the Rio Olympics — Coleman, Baker, Lyles and Mike Rodgers (fourth in 10.01).

Nobody has been faster since Rio than Coleman’s 9.82 last year. At 2017 Worlds, he finished between Justin Gatlin and Usain Bolt. Then last winter, he ran faster than the 60m world record three times.

But Coleman was beaten by Baker at consecutive May meets before taking all of June off from competition with a hamstring injury. Rabat marked his first race in 44 days.

“This is a relief, finally getting a win under my belt,” Coleman said. “I look at this as kind of my re-season opening. It’s the first time I came into a meet with full confidence in my leg.”

Lyles, the U.S. 100m champion in Coleman’s absence, nearly came from behind to steal the win. It’s no surprise as Lyles is known for his 200m prowess. He would have won a 105-meter race on Thursday.

Full Rabat results are here.

Christian Coleman

In other events, Olympic and world 800m champion Caster Semenya ran the fastest women’s 1000m in nearly 16 years, clocking 2:31.01 in the non-Olympic event.

World champion Mariya Lasitskene‘s 45-meet high-jump win streak ended as she finished third behind Bulgarian Mirela Demireva. Lasitskene’s last loss had been on June 23, 2016, according to Tilastopaja.org.

Kenyan Hellen Obiri beat a strong 5000m field in 14:21.75. Ethiopian-born Dutchwoman Sifan Hassan broke the European record for second place in 14:22.34, while U.S. Olympian Molly Huddle was 10th, one minute behind Obiri.

Olympic gold medalist Brianna McNeal won the 100m hurdles in 12.51, leading a U.S. sweep of the top four with Sharika Nelvis (12.58), Christina Manning (12.72) and Dawn Harper-Nelson (12.86). McNeal has the fastest time this year of 12.38. World-record holder Kendra Harrison was not in the field.

U.S. Olympic champion Matthew Centrowitz faded to 10th in a 1500m won by Moroccan Brahim Kaazouzi in 3:33.22. Centrowitz clocked 3:35.17, the fastest time by an American this year by .88 of a second.

Olympic 400m champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo of the Bahamas won the 200m in 22.29 seconds, overtaking Brit Dina Asher-Smith. U.S. champion Jenna Prandini was third in 22.60, one tenth ahead of rising Harvard senior Gabby Thomas, who won the Lausanne Diamond League 200m on July 5. Nigerian Blessing Okagbare-Ighoteguonor holds the fastest time in the world this year of 22.04.

Ethiopian Yomif Kejelcha won the 3000m by 1.33 seconds in 7:32.93, eight days after he was disqualified from a 5000m for nearly pulling another runner down by his shorts in Lausanne. American Paul Chelimo, the Olympic 5000m silver medalist, was fourth.

World champion Sam Kendricks of the U.S. won the pole vault with a 5.86-meter clearance. Rival and world-record holder Renaud Lavillenie was shockingly eighth with three fails at 5.60 meters.

The Diamond League moves to Monaco next Friday, with love coverage on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA and NBC Sports Gold.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Olympic stars demand IAAF rescind testosterone rule

Lindy Remigino, 1952 Olympic 100m champion, dies at 87

Lindy Remigino
Manhattan Athletics
Leave a comment

Lindy Remigino, who went from fifth at the NCAA Championships to winning the Olympic 100m in about a month in 1952, died at age 87 on Wednesday, according to Manhattan College, his alma mater.

Remigino, then 21, earned gold at the Helsinki Games in the closest Olympic sprint final in history (video here), according to Olympic historians.

The first four finishers were given times of 10.4 seconds, and a photo was needed to determine the medalists.

“I wasn’t nervous,” Remigino said later, according to Manhattan College. “I was used to running in front of a lot of people at Madison Square Garden. I got off to a good start, and I had the lead by the 55-meter mark. I said to myself, ‘I’m going to win this thing,’ but I leaned too early. I leaned 25 meters from the finish and thought I blew it.”

Remigino (wearing bib 981 in the above photo) was awarded gold ahead of Jamaican Herb McKenley and Brit McDonald Bailey.

“Herb and I were very close,” Remigino said, according to Manhattan College.  “I said to him, ‘Herb, I think you won this thing,’ but then they brought out the photo and showed us that I had won.”

Remigino’s automatic timing result was 10.79 seconds, .01 ahead of McKenley and just .12 faster than the last-place finisher in the six-man race. The 1996 Olympic women’s final saw Gail Devers and Merlene Ottey go one-two in the same time of 10.94 seconds, but the rest of that field was more separated than the 1952 men’s 100m.

Remigino later was part of the U.S. 4x100m team that also took gold in Helsinki.

Remigino had finished fifth in the 100 yards at the NCAA Championships the previous month and failed to qualify for the AAU Championships final. He surprisingly made the U.S. Olympic team by finishing second at trials behind Art Bragg.

Remigino, named after Charles Lindbergh, went on to coach Hartford Public High School in Connecticut to 31 state team titles with 157 individual state champions. He was inducted into at least 10 halls of fame, including the USA Track and Field Hall of Fame in 2017.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Tokyo 2020 Olympic torch relay schedule unveiled

Lindy Remigino
The photo finish of the 1952 Olympic men’s 100m.

Sarah Hirshland is first woman named U.S. Olympic Committee CEO

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The U.S. Olympic Committee named Sarah Hirshland its new CEO, the first woman to hold the permanent role after 11 men dating to 1950.

Hirshland, the chief commercial officer for the United States Golf Association, takes over during what she called “a critical moment in time” in its history.

The USOC and multiple national governing bodies for Olympic sports are dealing with sexual-abuse scandals, notably Larry Nassar‘s crimes against gymnasts.

“I also recognize the challenges ahead as we navigate this critical moment in the USOC’s history,” Hirshland said in a press release. “We must protect, support and empower athletes, young and old, elite and beginner. Olympic and Paralympic sport in the United States must be a shining example, able to provide athletes with the benefits of participation in an environment free from abuse of any kind. The USOC has made great strides in this area, and I look forward to carrying on that critically important work.

Hirshland said she took the job because it’s “an opportunity to take on a challenge.”

“As a female leader in the world of sport, I understand the importance of creating cultural change,” she said.

Hirshland has been with the USGA since 2011. Before that, she was senior vice president for strategic business development at Wasserman Media Group, headed by Casey Wasserman, the Los Angeles 2028 Olympic leader.

The previous USOC CEO, Scott Blackmun, resigned in February, citing prostate cancer and the USOC’s need to immediately address the USA Gymnastics sexual-abuse scandal. Blackmun had been CEO since January 2010.

Susanne Lyons, a USOC board member, was acting CEO the last four months during the search for Blackmun’s successor. Lyons and Stephanie Streeter were the only women to be USOC CEO, but both were in acting roles as searches went on to find full-time replacements.

The USOC’s work ahead also includes planning for the 2028 Los Angeles Olympics (the first hosted by the U.S. since the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Games) and potentially bidding for the 2030 Winter Games with Denver, Reno-Tahoe or Salt Lake City.

ALL-TIME USOC EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS/CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
1. Lyman Bingham (1950-November 1965)
2. Arthur G. Lentz (November 1965-February 1973; leave of absence June-December, 1968)
3. Everett Barnes (Acting Executive Director, June-December, 1968)
4. Don Miller (February 1973-February 1985)
5. George D. Miller (February 1985-August 1987)
6. Baaron B. Pittenger (Acting Executive Director, October-December 1987; Executive Director, January 1988-July 1990)
7. Harvey W. Schiller (January 1988; January 1990-October 1994)
8. John Krimsky Jr. (Interim Executive Director, October 1994-September 1995)
9. Richard D. Schultz (September 1995-February 2000)
10. Norman Blake (February 2000-November 2000)
11. Scott Blackmun (Acting Chief Executive Officer, November 2000-October 2001)
12. Lloyd Ward (October 2001-March 2003)
13. Jim Scherr (Acting Chief Executive Officer, March 2003-April 2005; Chief Executive Officer, April 2005-March 2009)
14. Stephanie A. Streeter (Acting Chief Executive Officer, March-December 2009)
15. Scott Blackmun (January 2010-February 2018)
16. Susanne Lyons (Acting Chief Executive Officer, February-August 2018)
17. Sarah Hirshland (August 2018-)

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Tokyo 2020 Olympic torch relay schedule unveiled