Peter Fill

Ilka Stuhec beats Lindsey Vonn in World Cup Finals downhill

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Slovenian Ilka Stuhec spoiled the day for Lindsey Vonn and Mikaela Shiffrin by dominating the World Cup Finals downhill in Aspen, Colo., on Wednesday.

Stuhec won by a comfortable .66 over Vonn, adding the World Cup downhill season title to her world championships gold medal last month. Italian Sofia Goggia was third, 1.03 behind.

Stuhec won half of the eight World Cup downhills this season after needing 113 World Cup starts before notching her first podium in December. She was 25th in the downhill standings last season.

Vonn finished runner-up at her third straight World Cup race on Wednesday. She actually fell crossing the finish and slid into a soft barrier, but Vonn walked off smiling.

Vonn, who came back in January from crash-caused knee and arm fractures last year, raced Wednesday with a chest cold and her right glove taped to her ski pole. She has dealt with a lack of feeling in her hand resulting from breaking her right upper arm in a November training crash.

“I think it cost me a couple of tenths, but I should have been a lot faster than a couple of tenths today to beat Ilka, so probably didn’t really matter,” Vonn said on NBCSN.

She remains stuck on 77 career World Cup wins, nine shy of the record held by retired Swede Ingemar Stenmark.

Vonn, 32, has averaged about 10 wins per season when fully healthy, but six-time Olympic medalist Bode Miller says she is now facing the toughest two rivals of her career in Stuhec and Goggia.

“Lindsey hasn’t seen that type of competition in the last several years,” Miller said on the NBCSN broadcast. “She’s definitely going to have to buckle down in the offseason and get things figured out. For me, Lindsey at her best and over the course of a season is going to have several wins in the downhill and super-G. She just is that strong.”

Stuhec’s win also kept Shiffrin from clinching her first World Cup overall title. Shiffrin, who didn’t race Wednesday, will clinch Thursday if Stuhec finishes third or lower in the super-G.

If not, Shiffrin will clinch Saturday or Sunday if she finishes in the top 12 of the slalom or giant slalom, or gets help from Stuhec, who is not strong in those disciplines.

Full Results | Broadcast Replay

Earlier, Italian Peter Fill repeated as men’s downhill season champion despite not winning any of the eight races this season.

Fill placed second, .08 behind countryman Dominik Paris, in the race on Wednesday. That was enough to make up a 33-point standings deficit on Norway’s Kjetil Jansrud, who finished 11th in Aspen. Full results are here.

The World Cup Finals continue with men’s and women’s super-Gs on Thursday, expected to be Vonn’s last race of the season. NBCSN, NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app will air coverage from 12-2 p.m. ET.

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Ted Ligety fifth in Beaver Creek super-G; Swiss wins (video)

Ted Ligety
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If Ted Ligety is going to be a multiple-medal threat in Sochi, he must produce strong results outside the giant slalom.

He took a step in Beaver Creek, Colo., on Saturday, with his third top-five super-G finish over the last four World Cup seasons.

Ligety navigated the Birds of Prey course in 1 minute, 22.21 seconds, which was good for fifth place, .48 behind Swiss winner Patrick Kueng.

“My super-G has a big range,” Ligety said, according to USA Today. “When it’s steep, I’m one of the fastest guys. If it’s flat and easy, I’m one of the middle-of-the-pack guys. So it depends where my skill set falls in there. So when it’s steep, like it is here for the most part, I have a good chance of making up time. When it’s more moderate, guys like Aksel [Lund Svindal] have a chance to beat me every time.”

Kueng, 29, who finished fifth in the previous two World Cup races, won his first career World Cup race.

“I knew I was in a good shape, in training I was fast,” Kueng said on NBC. “It’s incredible.”

Austrian Otmar Striedinger, who had never finished better than 17th in a World Cup, was second, .24 behind. Hannes Reichelt of Austria and Peter Fill of Italy shared third. Norway’s Svindal, who won the downhill Friday, came in seventh to keep his overall World Cup lead.

Ligety, 29, dominated at the World Championships in February, winning the giant slalom, super-G and super combined. He became the first man in 45 years to win three gold medals at a single worlds.

But Ligety had never before won an international super-G or super combined race (he won the 2006 Olympic combined). He missed a gate in last week’s super-G in Lake Louise, Alberta.

Ligety will be the favorite when the Beaver Creek World Cup stop concludes with a giant slalom at 11:45 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. ET on Sunday. NBCSN will have coverage at 3 p.m. ET.

Ligety is the reigning World Cup and world champion in the giant slalom. He won the season-opening giant slalom in Soelden, Austria, on Oct. 27.

“My slalom is like fine china,” he said, according to USA Today. “It’s really nice and looks pretty sometimes and it can be fast, but if you drop it, it breaks easily. Whereas maybe my giant slalom is like an iron skillet, where you can kick it around and do anything with it and it holds up. That’s been a little bit frustrating for me, but that’s how it kind of goes sometimes in ski racing.”

On Saturday, Olympic super-G silver medalist Bode Miller placed 14th, one spot lower than his season-best downhill finish Friday. Miller, 36 and a four-time Olympian, missed all of last season following knee surgery.

Miller said he skied “pretty close” to the peak of his ability, according to the Denver Post.

“There’s three really blind turns there that are pretty nasty at high speed at the top, and I hit all three of them within a foot of where I wanted to be, at full speed,” Miller told the newspaper. “For me, that’s really encouraging.”

Beaver Creek super-G
1. Patrick Kueng (SUI) 1:21.73
2. Otmar Striedinger (AUT) 1:21.97
3. Hannes Reichelt (AUT) 1:22.11
3. Peter Fill (ITA) 1:22.11
5. Ted Ligety (USA) 1:22.21
6. Thomas Mermillod Blondin (FRA) 1:22.27
7. Aksel Lund Svindal (NOR) 1:22.34
8. Werner Heel (ITA) 1:22.41
9. Kjetil Jansrud (NOR) 1:22.64
10. Matthias Mayer (AUT) 1:22.66
14. Bode Miller (USA) 1:22.98
20. Andrew Weibrecht (USA) 1:23.29
37. Steven Nyman (USA) 1:24.02
47. Marco Sullivan (USA) 1:25.09
DNF. Nick Daniels (USA)
DNF. Erik Fisher (USA)
DNF. Travis Ganong (USA)
DNF. Jared Goldberg (USA)
DNF. Brennan Rubie (USA)

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