Queen Elizabeth II

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Queen Elizabeth wanted speaking role with James Bond in Olympic skit

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Queen Elizabeth II stipulated that she deliver the line, “Good evening, Mr. Bond,” in her famous 2012 Olympic skit with Daniel Craig, playing James Bond, according to a new book.

Angela Kelly, who has worked with the Queen for 25 years as a dresser, personal adviser, curator and designer, reportedly relayed the story in “The Other Side of the Coin: The Queen, the Dresser and the Wardrobe.”

“There are few occasions on which Her Majesty will agree to break protocol, but in 2011 when film director Danny Boyle approached the Royal Household, he had a request to make that we simply could not refuse,” Kelly wrote, according to “Hello!” magazine. “She was very amused by the idea and agreed immediately. I asked then if she would like a speaking part. Without hesitation, Her Majesty replied: ‘Of course I must say something. After all, he is coming to rescue me.’

“I asked whether she would like to say: ‘Good evening, James,’ or ‘Good evening, Mr Bond,’ and she chose the latter, knowing the Bond films. Within minutes, I was back in [private secretary] Edward [Young]‘s office delivering the good news to Danny – I think he almost fell off his chair when I said that the Queen’s only stipulation was that she could deliver that iconic line: ‘Good evening, Mr Bond.'”

In earlier interviews, the Oscar-winning director Boyle said the London Olympic Opening Ceremony team first asked for permission from the royals to assure them they wouldn’t be embarrassed by the skit. Boyle thought they would use an actress to play the Queen, perhaps Helen Mirren.

“They came back and said, ‘We’re delighted for you to do it, and Her Majesty would like to be in it herself,'” Boyle said in 2013. “And this surreal thing, she would like to play herself.”

Boyle remembered filming the skit in a room where the Queen greets prime ministers. She was not in a good mood after spending the morning with the dentist. At the time, Boyle did not have her down for a speaking role.

“She said, ‘Don’t you think I should say something?'” Boyle remembered. The director obliged and asked what she preferred. “She said, ‘Oh, I’ll do something,’ and we started shooting, and she turned around and she said her lines, beautifully.”

Boyle, in multiple interviews, has cited one part of the five-minute skit as being particularly memorable.

“[The Queen] passes [Bond],” he said on NBC immediately after the Opening Ceremony. “He gives a look as he says, ‘Good evening, your Majesty.’ She walks past him. He does this thing where he thinks I’m a fictional character, she’s a real queen, she’s passing me by and these two worlds are joining. What’s that mean? I’m not sure, but I’m carrying on.”

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Best photos from USPA National Skydiving Championships

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More than 500 skydivers competed at the United States Parachute Association (USPA) National Skydiving Championships, the largest annual skydiving competition in the world.

The best jumps from the USPA National Skydiving Championships will air tonight on Universal HD at 7:00 p.m. ET.

Skydiving is not an Olympic sport, but several skydivers have made cameos at the Olympics.

Dozens of free-falling parachutists formed the five Olympic rings in the sky during the Opening Ceremony of the 1988 Games.

Then at the Opening Ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics, stunt doubles playing Queen Elizabeth II and actor Daniel Craig leapt from a helicopter and parachuted into the Olympic Stadium (VIDEO).

Below are images via the USPA, captured by David Cherry and Martin Lemay:

USPA National Skydiving Championships

USPA National Skydiving Championships

USPA National Skydiving Championships

USPA National Skydiving Championships

USPA National Skydiving Championships

Bradley Wiggins knighted by Queen Elizabeth II

Bradley Wiggins
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Call him Sir Bradley Wiggins.

The 2012 Olympic and Tour de France champion was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace on Tuesday.

“I can’t remember what she said or what I said,” Wiggins said, according to Sky Sports. “It’s probably more nervous going up there and doing something like that being in an Olympic final.”

Wiggins is a five-time Olympic champion and seven-time medalist over four Games, combining medals in track and road cycling. He is tied with fellow cyclist Chris Hoy for the most Olympic medals won by a British athlete.

Hoy, who has also received knighthood, retired after the 2012 Olympics, but Wiggins is training on. That’s a reason why he won’t celebrate Tuesday’s honor too much.

“It’s quite a nerve-racking thing for me, actually,” Wiggins said, according to Sky Sports. “It’s not a comfortable environment for me being in there. But it’s an incredibly humbling experience.

“At the end of the day, as a sportsman, you do it for success. You never expect to be given things like this.”

Wiggins, 33, became the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France in 2012. He also won the Olympic road cycling time trial and the BBC Sports Personality of the Year last year.

“This puts closure to 2012,” he said.

Wiggins repeated that he’s planning to ride in the 2014 Tour de France after missing this year’s grand tour with a knee injury. Team Sky teammate Chris Froome won the Tour after being one of Wiggins’ support riders in 2012.

Wiggins and Froome have not always been on the best of terms.

“[Froome] has the right to defend that title next year,” Wiggins said. “If I can play a support role, even, I’d love to be back in a successful team and on the start line.”

Video: Tour de France winner Chris Froome grapples with sumo wrestler