Queen Harrison

David Rudisha

Zurich Diamond League final preview

Leave a comment

The Diamond League circuit concludes with two finals meets in Zurich on Thursday and Brussels on Sept. 5.

The finals are labeled that way because they mark the last competitions in individual event Diamond Races, accumulation points standings that determine season-long champions.

The Diamond League finals provide double the points than the previous Diamond League meets. That means first place in Zurich awards eight points, second place gets four points and third place two points.

Each of the 32 individual event Diamond Race winners receive $40,000 and a Diamond Trophy. Half of the Diamond Races conclude in Zurich. The other 16 conclude in Brussels.

In Zurich, 14 of the 16 Diamond Races are still in play. Only LaShawn Merritt (400m) and Sandra Perkovic (discus) have their titles already clinched, so long as they show up in Switzerland.

The rest of the events are headlined by Allyson Felix and David Rudisha with Universal Sports and UniversalSports.com coverage starting at 2 p.m. ET. Don’t forget Tyson Gay and Asafa Powell racing in the 100m, a non-Diamond Race event.

Here are five Diamond Races to watch in Zurich:

Men’s triple jump — 2 p.m. ET

Standings
1. Will Claye (USA) — 14 points
2. Christian Taylor (USA) — 12 points

The Americans who went one-two at the London Olympics will do battle for another title in Zurich. This time, London silver medalist Claye is in the driver’s seat.

Claye has had a better season than Taylor, leaping personal bests 17.66m in May and 17.75m in June, the latter winning the U.S. Championships in Sacramento, Calif. Claye celebrated that jump, while wearing a backwards cap, by running into the stands.

But Taylor, who opened his season running 400m races, won the last Diamond League triple jump in Glasgow, Scotland, on July 12. Claye was second there. If that result repeats in Zurich, Taylor will claim the Diamond Race title.

Women’s 1500m — 2:38

Standings
1. Abeba Aregawi (SWE) — 12 points
2. Sifan Hassan (NED) — 10 points
3. Jenny Simpson (USA) — 9 points

Simpson, the 2011 World champion, is having the best season of her career. She’s gone under her previous personal best twice, including a 3:57.22 in Paris on July 5. Then she beat the Ethiopian-born Aregawi and Hassan, along with Genzebe Dibaba, in Stockholm on Thursday.

That victory put Simpson in control of her own destiny in Zurich. Win, and she takes the Diamond Race. If she finishes second, she can also capture the season title if Aregawi doesn’t finish first or third and Hassan doesn’t win.

Women’s 100m — 2:59

Standings
1. Kerron Stewart (JAM) — 7 points
2. Murielle Ahoure (CIV) — 3 points
3. Veronica Campbell-Brown (JAM) — 2 points
3. Blessing Okagbare (NIG) — 2 points
3. Myriam Soumare (FRA) — 2 points

Few could have predicted how this event would play out this season. Olympic and World champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce prevailed in the opener in Doha but hasn’t won since and isn’t in the Zurich field after scratching the Birmingham 100m on Sunday.

American Tori Bowie, primarily a long jumper until March, won three of the six Diamond Race events so far this season, giving her 12 points and the lead. But she pulled up with a leg injury in Birmingham and will miss Zurich, meaning she is not eligible to win the Diamond Race.

That leaves the Jamaican veteran Stewart as the leader. Stewart, 30 and a 2008 Olympic 100m silver medalist, hasn’t broken 11 seconds this year for the first time since 2007. She’ll likely need to finish second to win the Diamond Race, and it won’t be easy. Okagbare and Campebell-Brown are the fastest women this year in the field. Olympic 200m champion Allyson Felix and the world’s fastest 200m runner this year, the Netherlands’ Dafne Schippers, are also in the field.

Men’s 800m — 3:08

Standings
1. David Rudisha (KEN) — 8 points
2. Nijel Amos (BOT) — 6 points
3. Asbel Kiprop (KEN) — 4 points
3. Adam Kszczot (POL) — 4 points

The Olympic champion and world record holder Rudisha will clinch the Diamond Race title with a victory or by finishing second if Amos, Kiprop and Kszczot don’t win. Rudisha, who came back in June after missing more than a year of competition with a knee injury, has looked more beatable this season that any time over the last five years. He is coming off a 600m victory in Birmingham, England, on Sunday.

World champion Mohammed Aman can prevail in the Diamond Race with a win if Rudisha doesn’t finish second. Aman won a pair of 800m races at Diamond League meets this year, but they didn’t count in the Diamond Race standings.

Women’s 100m Hurdles — 3:17

Standings
1. Queen Harrison (USA) — 17 points
2. Dawn Harper-Nelson (USA) — 13 points

Americans have won all six 100m hurdles races this season — Harrison with three, Harper-Nelson with two and World champion Brianna Rollins with one. Australian Olympic champion Sally Pearson is also in this field, but the Diamond Race will come down to Harrison, a 2008 Olympian in the 400m hurdles, and the 2008 Olympic champion Harper-Nelson.

Harper-Nelson closed the gap on Harrison with a Birmingham victory and owns the fastest time in the world this year (12.44).

Video: Youth Olympics 8x100m relay

Allyson Felix edged out by Blessing Okagbare at Paris Diamond League

Leave a comment

Reigning Olympic champion Allyson Felix took second place in the 200m event  at the Paris Diamond League. A week earlier, Felix withdrew from the U.S. championships after placing 14th in the 100m prelims. Felix, who tore her hamstring at the 2013 World Championships, was run down by Blessing Okagbare and finished just two-hundredths of a second behind the Nigerian. Felix’s time of 22.34s was her best this season.

The other Olympic star in the race, Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, came in fifth. Fraser-Pryce took silver in the 200m in London.

American Mike Rodgers, who took third place behind Justin Gatlin and Tyson Gay on Friday’s 100m race in Lausanne, returned to the Diamond League to take first. He clocked a time of 10.00s; Gatlin, who did not compete in Paris, won two days earlier with world-leading time of 9.80s.

Also noteworthy were two runners who didn’t cross the finish line. Former 100m world record holder Asafa Powell was anticipated to return to the track in Paris after being granted a temporary reprieve from his suspension for a failed drug test. However, he withdrew due to a reported hamstring injury. Powell will appeal having to serve the rest of his ban, which was set to end in December, to the Court of Arbitration for Sport on July 7-8.

Another Jamaican, Nickel Ashmeade, false-started and delayed the race for several minutes as he vehemently protested his disqualification. Arguing with officials and sitting on the track, Ashmeade had to be convinced to leave before the remaining runners could compete.

Americans swept the podium in the women’s 100m hurdles, with Dawn Harper-Nelson finishing in 12.44s, the fastest time in the world this season. Harper-Nelson also won this event at the U.S. Championships. Queen Harrison and Lolo Jones, returning to the track after competing in two-woman bobsled at the Sochi Olympics, came in second and third, respectively.

Olympic gold medalist Sally Pearson finished sixth.

American Michael Tinsley lost to Puerto Rico’s Javier Culson in the men’s 400m hurdles in Lausanne two days ago, but was victorious in Paris. Culson, who previously tied Tinsley for top of the standings in this event, finished third. Olympic decathalon champion Ashton Eaton came in sixth.

Five-time Olympic medalist Sanya Richards-Ross took first place in the women’s 400m, followed by Jamaicans Stephenie Ann McPherson and Novlene Williams-Mills.

Three other events saw season’s best times: Kenya’s Asbel Kiprop in the men’s 800m with 1:43:34, the Netherland’s Sifan Hassan in the women’s 1,500m with 3:57:00, and Kenya’s Edwin Cheruiyot Soi in the men’s 5,000m with 12:59.82.

The next Diamond League meet will be held in Glasgow on July 11-12.

Gatlins wins 100m over Gay at Lausanne Diamond League

Lolo Jones boosted by relay teammates in return to track

Lolo Jones
Leave a comment

Lolo Jones got off to a slow start in her first track event since competing in bobsled at the Sochi Olympics in February, but her shuttle hurdles relay team still won at the Drake Relays in Des Moines, Iowa, on Friday night.

Jones, who said she has lost more than 20 pounds since Sochi, ran the second leg of a 4x100m shuttle hurdles relay on the USA Red team with 2013 world champion Brianna RollinsQueen Harrison and Vashti Thomas.

Rollins handed a lead to Jones, who lost it with a stuttering hop over her first hurdle, taking nine steps instead of the customary seven. Harrison and Thomas got it back to win in 50.93 seconds, beating a Jamaican team that ran 52.01.

“I made probably the biggest hurdle mistake you can make … for a 100m hurdle race, you’re pretty much sitting in a coffin like ‘the race is over,'” Jones said, according to The Associated Press. “So at that moment I crossed the line I was like, ‘All right, Queen! Let’s go team,’ because if it was individual, Lolo would be in last place.”

Nia Ali, the 2014 world indoor 60m hurdles champion, suffered an injury in warm-ups, which kept a USA White team from competing. It was set to include 2008 Olympic champion Dawn Harper-Nelson and 2012 Olympic bronze medalist Kellie Wells.

In other events, 2013 world champion LaShawn Merritt edged rival and 2012 Olympic champion Kirani James in the 400m, 44.44 to 44.60. 2004 Olympic champion Jeremy Wariner was last in 46.90.

2012 Olympic bronze medalist Hansle Parchment of Jamaica won the 110m hurdles in a world-leading 13.14 seconds, beating a field that included Americans David Oliver and Ryan Wilson, who went one-two at the 2013 World Championships.

“I am surprised with that time,” said Parchment, who ran .12 faster than Oliver’s previous world lead for 2014, to Lewis Johnson for Universal Sports. “I didn’t expect to run that fast so quickly [early in the season].”

2012 Olympic silver medalist Michael Tinsley won the 400m hurdles in 48.57, ahead of Olympic bronze medalist Javier Culson (48.68). Olymipc champion Felix Sanchez was sixth in 49.84.

Sochi produces Winter Olympics record 8th doping case