Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

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Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Dafne Schippers out of world championships 200m

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Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, the freshly crowned world 100m champion, and Dafne Schippers, the two-time reigning world 200m champion, both withdrew before the 200m that began with heats at the world championships in Doha on Monday.

Neither absence was a surprise.

The Jamaican Fraser-Pryce withdrew after storming to her fourth world 100m title on Sunday night. A turnaround to start the 200m the following day is a tough ask. Men’s 100m champ Christian Coleman similarly withdrew before the men’s 200m heats on Sunday.

The Dutchwoman Schippers reached Sunday’s 100m final but did not contest it, suffering an adductor problem in the earlier semifinals, according to the IAAF.

While Fraser-Pryce and Schippers combined to win the last three world titles at 200m, they rank Nos. 7 and 13 in the world this year in the event. The 200m also lacks 2017 World silver medalist Marie-Josee Ta Lou of Cote d’Ivoire and the fastest woman in the world this year, Bahamian Shaunae Miller-Uibo, who is only doing the 400m at worlds because of the schedule.

The favorites in the 200m (the final is Wednesday) are Brit Dina Asher-Smith and Jamaican Olympic champion Elaine Thompson. The top-ranked American this year is Anglerne Annelus, who is seeded fourth.

TRACK WORLDS: Results | TV Schedule

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Mother’s Day: Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Allyson Felix win historic golds at world champs

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Two years ago, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce went into labor while watching the women’s 100m final at the world championships. On Sunday, at the next edition of the biennial worlds, she became the first mom to win an Olympic or world 100m title in 24 years and the oldest woman (mother or not) to do it at age 32.

Fraser-Pryce and Allyson Felix made it an unforgettable night for athlete moms, each earning record-breaking gold medals in Doha.

Fraser-Pryce, a 32-year-old Jamaican with Superman ice cream-colored hair, became the oldest woman to win an Olympic or world 100m title, two years after having her first child, Zyon.

“The females keep showing up,” Fraser-Pryce said on the BBC while holding Zyon across her chest. “Hoping that I can give inspiration to all the women who are thinking about starting a family or currently starting a family and wondering if they can come back.”

Fraser-Pryce, up to six combined Olympic and world 100m titles, became the first mom to win the sport’s marquee sprint at an Olympics or worlds since Gwen Torrence in 1995. She clocked 10.71 seconds, fastest time in the world this year, beating Brit Dina Asher-Smith by .12. Ivorian Marie-Josee Ta Lou took bronze.

Rio gold medalist Elaine Thompson was fourth, losing a 100m final to her countrywoman for the first time.

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It was in Rio that Fraser-Pryce took bronze in the 100m with an injured toe, after golds in 2008 and 2012. There was reason to doubt if she could remain a podium finisher going into her 30s. And that was before pregnancy meant she would take 20 months before her next meet in 2018.

“When I found out I was pregnant, I was sitting on my bed for like two hours, and I didn’t go to practice in the morning because I didn’t know what to do,” Fraser-Pryce said. “I made a vow that I was coming back.”

On Aug. 6, 2017, Fraser-Pryce watched the world women’s 100m final on TV. “I remember sitting there, and I went into labor because I was watching the race,” she said. “So I had my son the next day, like in the evening during the medal [ceremony]. So that was my gold medal.”

Zyon came via C-section on Aug. 7, 2017. Fraser-Pryce went three or four months before lifting a weight. Once she returned to the track, she skipped practices here or there due to pain.

“I wouldn’t trade it for anything else,” she said. “Because it has definitely made me tougher, and stronger and more committed.”

In her first meet back in 2018, Fraser-Pryce clocked 11.52 seconds, eight tenths off her best. She raced eight times before breaking 11 again, all while breastfeeding for the first 15 months.

This year, she’s run in the 10.7s a total of four times, becoming the fastest mom in history. Her coach told her earlier that she’s still not all the way back.

“Zyon has been my strength, my family, my husband, they have been my strength,” she said. “When everybody else doubted, they never did.”

The U.S. failed to put a woman in the top four at a worlds for the first time in history. National champion Teahna Daniels was seventh.

Defending champion Tori Bowie withdrew before the semifinals after struggling coming back from injury and dealing with a coaching change. Fellow Rio Olympian English Gardner pulled up with a leg injury in her semifinal, her latest poor luck with health. It’s very possible the U.S. could also miss the medals in the 200m and 400m, too, unprecedented for the world’s greatest track nation.

At least there is Felix.

At 33, she broke her tie with Usain Bolt for the most world titles, grabbing her 12th overall and first as a mom as part of the first mixed-gender 4x400m relay. More on that here.

Felix said she has spoken a lot with Fraser-Pryce.

“I got goosebumps watching her run,” she said. “She’s had a hard road, too, and really keeps encouraging me. Her first year wasn’t the best, but the second year, I mean, she’s better than ever. … She’s leading the way.”

In other events, American Christian Taylor earned his fourth world title in the triple jump, adding to his two Olympic golds.

Taylor fouled his first two jumps, registered a clean one on his third to stay alive and then posted the two best marks of 17.86 and 17.92 meters. Taylor relegated countryman Will Claye to silver and a lower podium spot for a sixth time. Claye owns seven total Olympic or world silver or bronze medals, but no golds.

Russian pole vaulter Anzehlika Sidorova cleared 4.95 meters on her third attempt to relegate American Sandi Morris to her third straight silver medal at a global outdoor championship. Sidorova will hear the IAAF anthem at her medal ceremony since Russia is still banned from sending teams to international track and field meets for its doping problems.

In semifinals, American contenders Donavan Brazier and Clayton Murphy advanced to Tuesday’s final. That final will lack two-time Olympic champion and world-record holder David Rudisha (out the last two years, partly due to injury), the defending world champion Pierre-Ambroise Bosse of France and the fastest man this year, Botswana’s Nijel Amos (Achilles).

Brazier, third-fastest in the world this year, won his semifinal in 1:44.87. Murphy, the Rio Olympic bronze medalist, advanced as a time qualifier after placing third in his semifinal in 1:44.48.

The 200m favorite Noah Lyles cruised in his world championships debut, easing up to take second in his first-round heat in 20.26 seconds and advancing to Monday’s semifinals. He ran in silver hair as an homage to Dragon Ball Z character Goku, whose hair turns silver at his final stage, Ultra Instinct.

Lyles owns the world’s fastest time this year — 19.50 seconds — which is .23 faster than anybody else in the field has clocked in 2019.

NBC Olympics senior researcher Alex Azzi contributed to this report from Doha.

MORE: No Christian Coleman-Noah Lyles showdown at track worlds

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Christian Coleman wins world 100m title in straight line after career twists

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Immediately after Christian Coleman sped through the finish line with the fastest 100m of his life, in the biggest race of his life, he let out a roar of at least three seconds. He slapped his chest, again and again, as is required of sprint kings. He came to a stop and yelled at the cameras, “Don’t play with me!”

Coleman had just cemented himself as the world’s fastest active man with his world championships victory in 9.76 seconds, becoming the sixth-fastest in history.

He ran away from countryman Justin Gatlin, who is 14 years older at 37, and won by .13, matching the largest margin of victory of Usain Bolt‘s three world titles. Canadian Andre De Grasse took bronze at 9.90 in Doha.

Coleman may not be as well-known as the Olympic medalists Gatlin and De Grasse, the two closest to Bolt in Rio. But he actually has been No. 1 on the fastest times lists for three years running, building Bolt-like momentum (if not Bolt-like times, yet) going into the Olympic year.

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Coleman will tell you it has not been nearly as smooth as the recent statistics show — personal bests of 9.82 seconds in 2017, 9.79 in 2018 and 9.76 in 2019. Certainly not easy before that marvelous stretch. Not during it, either.

“I feel like I always walk around with a chip on my shoulder,” Coleman said. “The road to success is never going to be straight.”

The winding path goes back to high school 20 miles south of Atlanta.

Coleman, though listed in his yearbook as most likely to receive a Nike endorsement, was under-recruited as an undersized all-state defensive back before opting to focus on track. Coleman is listed at 5 feet, 9 inches now, eight inches below Bolt.

At the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials, he broke 10 seconds for the first time in the semifinals. But then he went .11 slower in the final. He snuck on the Olympic team, as a rising Tennessee junior, as the last of six men in the relay pool. Had he repeated his trials semifinal time in the final, Coleman would have made the Olympic team in the individual 100m as the youngest American man to do so in 40 years. Instead, he competed only in the relay prelims in Rio. He watched the final from the stands, at first winning a silver medal through his teammates and then seeing it stricken via disqualification from a botched handoff.

Coleman returned to Knoxville and went back to work. Up until Saturday (and perhaps through it), his most buzzworthy footrace had no lanes — running a 40-yard dash in 4.12 seconds in 2017, one tenth faster than the NFL Combine record.

Later that year at the world championships, Coleman went head-to-head with Bolt for the first time and beat him, both in the semifinals and the final. An incredible feat, but one overshadowed by what happened in that 100m final in London. Coleman rocketed to the lead but did not have the stamina to win that 10-second race. He was passed by Gatlin and relegated to silver by .02 (but still better than a bronze Bolt).

After twice breaking the indoor 60m world record in early 2018, Coleman hit more bumps. First, a hamstring injury. He lost two straight races and went into his finale ranked 10th in the world for the season. Then he uncorked a 9.79 at the biggest meet of 2018, the Diamond League Final, and celebrated shaking his head, thumping his chest, pointing his finger and repeating, “Mine.”

This year brought two new challenges: the world’s best 200m sprinter, Noah Lyles, beat Coleman by a hair in Coleman’s season debut in May. Lyles isn’t running the 100m at worlds, but he plans to next year and is already the No. 1 contender to Coleman’s throne for Tokyo.

Then came Coleman’s complicated case of missed drug tests from late August. Coleman, who has never failed a drug test and says he doesn’t take any supplements, was ultimately cleared by close examination of rules but admitted to some negligence in updating his whereabouts so testers could find him. “At the end of the day it’s a paperwork issue,” he said this week.

“It completely disqualifies him, at this point, from ever being that face of the sport,” U.S. sprint legend and BBC analyst Michael Johnson said before worlds, noting that Coleman should not have been banned and also blaming USADA. “This will follow him, as it should.”

The media coverage affected him. He posted a 22-minute YouTube video explaining himself and calling out the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, among others, for allowing it to become public knowledge.

“I won’t say it’s been tough,” facing skepticism the last month, Coleman said on Saturday night. “To try to put something like that out there to try and smear my reputation, that’s pretty disheartening.”

Then came the 100m final. Coleman was the only man to break 10 seconds in either the first round or the semifinals. He was such a massive favorite that the world championships record for margin of victory — Gatlin’s .17 from 2005 — was a stat that had to be at the ready.

Coleman got the jump off the gun, just like two years ago. He led at the halfway, just like two years ago. And then he pulled away from Gatlin, who looked his age in losing his form in the final strides. The opposite of two years ago.

“I usually have a good start, but I don’t follow it up with execution, so I’ve been working on my drive phase and being patient,” Coleman said.

Then the celebration.

“All my worries just evaporated out there,” he said. “I don’t even know what I said. I was just excited.”

The roar was reminiscent of that emotional, comeback victory at the 2018 Diamond League Final. Built up from being unable to race at the last two meets of the Diamond League season while the drug-tests case was resolved. Had Coleman actually broken a rule, he would have faced punishment tantamount to failing a drug test, that could have kept him out of the Tokyo Olympics.

Now, he goes into the year of the first post-Bolt Games entrenched in that No. 1 position. But, it’s Coleman, which means an obstacle must be ahead.

Maybe it will be Lyles, who carries on Bolt’s charisma, to counter Coleman, a man typically of few public words (which made that 22-minute YouTube video all the more interesting).

For now Coleman says this: that he once again faced an obstacle and came out of it a faster sprinter than before.

“It just gives you a confidence boost moving forward and knowing that no matter what the circumstances I’m up against, no matter how I’m feeling, anything like that, I can always fight back from it and come out on top,” he said.

The U.S. won another gold medal Saturday — its first world medal of any color in the hammer throw. DeAnna Price, who came into the meet with the top three throws in the world this year, launched it 77.54 meters for the win. Price, who was eighth in Rio, improved on the previous best U.S. women’s hammer finish at an Olympics or worlds of sixth.

“I didn’t even think I was going to compete this year,” Price told Lewis Johnson on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA. “I was in a lot of pain. I couldn’t even throw over 70 meters.”

In Saturday’s other track final, Ethiopian-born Dutchwoman Sifan Hassan completed what could be the first half of a 10,000m-5000m double by taking the longer distance in 30:17.62. Hassan, who broke the mile world record in July, passed Ethiopian Letesenbet Gidey just before the bell and prevailed by 3.61 seconds.

Jamaica, without Bolt at worlds for the first time since 2003, still managed to pick up a gold on the night of the men’s 100m final. It was a surprise, going to long jumper Tajay Gayle. Gayle leaped a national record 8.69 meters, best in the world this year, to relegate U.S. Olympic champion Jeff Henderson to silver.

In track semifinals, all three 400m hurdles favorites advanced to Monday’s final — defending champion Karsten Warholm of Norway (48.20), American Rai Benjamin (48.52) and home-crowd favorite Abderrahman Samba of Qatar (48.72). The longest-standing men’s track world record could fall given they rank Nos. 2-4 in history. Kevin Young set the standard of 46.78 at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics.

American Donavan Brazier‘s chances increased for Tuesday’s 800m final when he won his semifinal and with the withdrawal of the world’s fastest man this year — Botswana’s Nijel Amos (Achilles). U.S. Olympic bronze medalist Clayton Murphy also made the final, which will not include two-time Olympic champion and world-record holder David Rudisha. The Kenyan has been out more than two years due in part to injuries.

Americans Ajee Wilson and Raevyn Rogers won women’s 800m semis, setting up a potential one-two in Monday’s final. The event lacks two-time Olympic champion Caster Semenya, plus the Rio silver and bronze medalists, all of whom are out due to the IAAF’s new rules capping testosterone in women’s events between the 400m and the mile.

Also Saturday, all of the women’s 100m favorites advanced to Sunday, when the semifinals and final will be contested. That includes Jamaican Olympic champions Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (10.80 seconds) and Elaine Thompson (11.14). All four Americans also advanced, including defending world champion Tori Bowie (11.30).

NBC senior Olympics researcher Alex Azzi contributed to this report from Doha.

MORE: Jamaican sprint phenom withdraws from worlds

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