Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics

Vladimir Putin

Vladimir Putin addresses Russia’s anti-gay law, Sochi Olympic costs, hockey

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Russian president Vladimir Putin said he hopes there will be no “negative implications” around the Sochi Olympics from his country’s law banning the promotion of “non-traditional” sexual relations toward minors.

Russian officials have said that homosexuals will not be discriminated against during the Games, Feb. 7-23, but that the law will be enforced.

“We have no laws against people with non-traditional sexual orientation,” Putin said, according to a 13,000-word transcript on the Kremlin’s website. “You kind of create an illusion among millions of spectators that we do have such laws, but we do not have such laws in Russia. Russia has adopted the law banning propaganda of non-traditional sexual relations among minors, but these are completely different things.”

Putin was asked specifically about the term “propaganda” in the law, and what that could mean. Here’s the question and answer on the Kremlin’s site:

JOHN DANISZEWSKI: When the law says it’s a crime to do propaganda, would that include things like waiving a rainbow flag or painting your body in rainbow colours? Is that propaganda for young people? Will visitors and athletes have to have these kinds of concern?

VLADIMIR PUTIN: No. In Russia, people who initiated these laws and who adopted this law (I, by the way, was not the initiator) assumed that homosexual marriages do not give children. Russia is going through hard times in terms of demographics. And we are more interested in full-fledged families and more children. It is not the main thing in the whole system of measures aimed at supporting demographic processes. But I think the authors of the law were guided by the need to solve demographic problems and were far from the idea of infringing anyone’s rights. And certainly not during the Olympic Games or other mass sport events, especially the Olympics – one can be absolutely sure that Russia will faithfully follow the principles of Olympism, which do not admit any kind of discrimination, national, gender, or sexual one, mentioned by you.

Putin also said he works with gay people and has awarded them state medals. He praised famous 19th-century Russian composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky, who was said to be homosexual.

“We have absolutely normal relations, and I don’t see anything out of the ordinary here,” Putin said, according to The Associated Press. “Truth be told, we don’t love him because of that, but he was a great musician and we all love his music.”

Putin said he would be open to meeting with members of the LGBT community.

Putin was also asked about Sochi Olympic spending and said 214 billion rubles ($6.4 billion) will be spent to prepare for the Games in February. Of the 214 billion, 100 billion came from the government and 114 billion from “private investors,” Putin said.

In February, the Russian government commission said 1.5 trillion rubles ($45 billion) would be spent, slightly more than the Olympic record cost of the 2008 Beijing Games, according to RIA Novosti.

“This country may have spent more to prepare for the Games in general, yet it has not invested more than any other country in the Olympic facilities themselves,” Putin said.

Finally, there was this exchange:

JOHN DANISZEWSKI: Are you willing tonight to predict the gold for the Russian hockey team?

VLADIMIR PUTIN: Of course, I can.

JOHN DANISZEWSKI: Ok, we will see.

VLADIMIR PUTIN: And what will you see? I have not yet told you what my predictions are.

JOHN DANISZEWSKI: Oh, I thought you were predicting a Russian victory. Or maybe just snow, there’ll be a lot of snow.

Pavel Bure says Russia ‘indisputable’ favorite for men’s hockey gold

Pavel Bure says Russia is ‘indisputable’ favorite for Olympic hockey gold

Pavel Bure
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The Russian Rocket put out some bulletin-board material for the rest of the Olympic men’s hockey field Wednesday.

“Every team has chances, but the fact that we are the favorites is indisputable,” two-time Olympian Pavel Bure said, according to R-Sport. “We’ll have a very strong team in Sochi with a great coaching staff and several world stars. And this team is capable of taking the trophy.”

The retired forward Bure, 42, won Olympic silver and bronze with Russia in 1998 and 2002. He was the general manager of the Russian team that took fourth in 2006. Russia lost in the quarterfinals in 2010. The nation hasn’t won gold in men’s hockey at the Olympics since the fall of the Soviet Union and the Unified Team’s triumph in 1992.

But home ice always helps, as Canada learned in 2010 on its way to gold.

The Olympic prediction service Infostrada has Russia winning men’s hockey gold, followed by Finland and the Czech Republic. It has neither Canada nor the U.S. winning men’s hockey medals. A North American nation hasn’t medaled at non-North American Olympics since the 1994 Lillehammer Games before the influx of NHL superstars in 1998.

Bure was just as impressive as an Olympian as he was for the Vancouver Canucks during his Hall of Fame career. He scored five goals in the 1998 semifinals before Russia was shut down by Czech goalie Dominik Hasek in the Nagano final. Bure tallied nine goals overall in the 1998 tournament.

Sochi Olympic curling schedule released

Ski jumper Sarah Hendrickson undergoes reconstructive knee surgery

Sarah Hendrickson
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World champion ski jumper Sarah Hendrickson underwent right knee surgery Thursday after a training crash last week.

The U.S. Ski Team said it’s too early to issue a specific return to snow date. The women’s ski jumping competition at the Sochi Olympics is Feb. 11.

Hendrickson, 19, needed ACL reconstruction, MCL and meniscal repair after crashing on a training jump in Oberstdorf, Germany, on Aug. 21. Hendrickson was jumping on the large hill in Oberstdorf and set a new personal record of 148 meters. Women’s ski jumping competitions are usually done on the normal hill, where they jump around 100 meters.

“Life has a crazy way of working out and this is definitely not the path I had planned,” Hendrickson said in a press release. “I’m determined to make my coaches, friends, family, country and myself proud by working as hard as I can on my recovery.”

If healthy, she’s considered a co-gold medal favorite in the first women’s ski jumping competition at the Olympics.

Her rival is Japan’s Sara Takanashi, 16, who beat Hendrickson for the 2012-13 World Cup season title. Hendrickson, however, edged Takanashi at the World Championships last February.

At last week’s crash, U.S. teammate Jessica Jerome said she was at the top of the ski jump, didn’t witness the impact but did see the aftermath.

“It kind of looked like every other ski jumping crash, where people are laying in the outrun,” she said. “The sad thing is it’s super unfortunate. We are all really bummed out and trying to be supportive as we can, and unfortunately the injury side of things are a part of sports.”

Hendrickson has appeared in good spirits on Twitter since suffering the injury.

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