Tejay van Garderen

Tejay van Garderen out of Tour de France

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CHALON-SUR-SAONE, France (AP) — American Tejay Van Garderen withdrew from the Tour de France after hitting the tarmac soon after the start of Friday’s Stage 7.

Van Garderen was attended by three of his teammates and eventually got back on his bike to finish with a bloodied face and ripped jersey. But he broke a bone in his left hand and his team later announced his withdrawal.

The top American rider in the race, van Garderen was 36th overall, 10 minutes and 26 seconds behind leader Giulio Ciccone.

“We will miss having him in the team,” EF Education First manager Jonathan Vaughters said. “He has showed great form coming into the race. We wish him a speedy recovery and hope that he’ll be back racing again soon.”

Van Garderen, 30, finished fifth at the Tour de France in 2012 and 2014, taking the white jersey as the highest-ranking rider younger than 26.

In 2015 and 2018, van Garderen was at one point during the Tour second overall, just missing becoming the second American to enter the history books as a Tour de France leader, along with the only American to win the Tour, three-time champion Greg LeMond, who last wore yellow in 1991.

Four other Americans wore the yellow jersey after LeMond, but all had their results retroactively stripped for doping (Lance ArmstrongDavid ZabriskieGeorge Hincapie and Floyd Landis).

There are three Americans left in this year’s Tour — Joey Rosskopf, Chad Haga and Ben King.

Watch world-class cycling events throughout the year with the NBC Sports Gold Cycling Pass, including all 21 stages of the Tour de France live & commercial-free, plus access to renowned races like La Vuelta, Paris-Roubaix, the UCI World Championships and many more.

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Tejay van Garderen misses Tour de France yellow jersey on tiebreak

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Tejay van Garderen nearly ended a lengthy U.S. yellow jersey drought at the Tour de France on Monday. He has the exact same time as leader and BMC teammate Greg Van Avermaet through three of 21 stages, but it’s the Belgian donning the maillot jaune on a tiebreaker.

The Tour de France rulebook spells it out:

The general individual time ranking is established by adding together the times achieved by each rider in the 21 stages including time penalties. In the event of a tie in the general ranking, the hundredth of a second recorded by the timekeepers during the individual time trial stages will be included in the total times in order to decide the overall winner. If a tie should still result from this, then the places achieved for each stage are added up and, as a last resort, the place obtained in the final stage is counted.

Since there have been no individual time trials, Van Avermaet is ahead of van Garderen because Van Avermaet finished ahead of van Garderen in each of the first two stages (by 30 places and 37 places, respectively), though they were in the same finishing group and received the same time.

Van Garderen has to be pleased to be in second place, given BMC won Monday’s team time trial, he has a teammate in yellow and his team leader, Richie Porte, has seconds on fellow favorites Chris FroomeVincenzo Nibali and Nairo Quintana.

But a yellow jersey would have been pretty sweet for the 29-year-old originally from Washington. He would have become the second American to enter the history books as a Tour de France leader, along with the only American to win the Tour, three-time champion Greg LeMond, who last wore yellow in 1991.

Four other Americans wore the yellow jersey after LeMond, but all had their results retroactively stripped for doping (Lance ArmstrongDavid ZabriskieGeorge Hincapie and Floyd Landis).

Van Garderen came close to yellow in 2015. He ranked second after stages nine through 13 and third after stages three through eight and 14 through 16, always trailing eventual winner Chris Froome. Van Garderen finished fifth overall in 2012 and 2014, winning the white jersey in 2012 as the best-placed rider under age 26.

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Kristin Armstrong, Taylor Phinney round out U.S. Olympic cycling team

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USA Cycling filled out its 21-member Olympic team Thursday, and making the cut was two-time Olympic gold medalist Kristin Armstrong. At 42 years old, she will become the oldest U.S. Olympic female cyclist of all time, according to sports-reference.com.

Armstrong was not a lock to make the team despite winning gold in the women’s time trial at the 2008 and 2012 Games. She will turn 43 on Aug. 11, one day after the women’s time trial in Rio. The women’s road race is Aug. 7. Armstrong placed 35th in the road race four years ago, and 25th eight years ago. Her Olympic debut came in the 2004 Athens Games, where she finished eighth in the road race.

“I feel that I’m still podium capable,” Armstrong told Cycling News last month. “I feel I’m still the most consistent time triallist in the U.S.”

Armstrong was a discretionary pick for the women’s road team along with Mara Abbott and Evelyn Stevens (2012 Olympian). Megan Guarnier had already clinched a berth with a bronze medal at the 2015 World Championships.

Highlighting the men’s road team is Taylor Phinney, who’s set to make his third Olympic appearance. It’s a well-deserved berth for the 25-year-old, who endured a long recovery from a severe crash in the 2014 USA Cycling National Road Championship. He suffered a compound fracture of his left tibia and fibula and was out of racing for more than a year. Phinney returned to competition in August 2015, and last month won this third time trial national championship.

Phinney placed fourth in both the time trial and road race at the London Games. He competed on the track in the Beijing Games, finishing seventh in individual pursuit.

In Rio, he’ll be joined on the men’s road team by 32-year-old Brent Bookwalter, who’ll make his Olympic debut. Top American cyclist Tejay van Garderen withdrew from Olympic consideration earlier this month due to Zika virus concerns.

The U.S. BMX team will be led by Nic Long and Alise Post, who both competed in the London Games and previously earned Rio berths with World Championship podium finishes. Corben Sharrah also previously had a spot after winning the U.S. Olympic Team Trials. Brooke Crain and Connor Fields, who will both make their second Olympic appearances, were the discretionary selections announced Thursday.

The U.S. mountain bike team will consist of Lea Davison (2012 Olympian), Howard Grotts and Chloe Woodruff. No U.S. mountain bikers earned automatic selections through previous competitions.

The U.S. track cycling team was announced in March and includes Matt Baranoski, Kelly Catlin, Chloe Dygert, Sarah Hammer (2008 and ’12 Olympian; two silver medals in London), Bobby Lea (2008 and ’12 Olympian), Jennifer Valente and Ruth Winder.

MORE: Nic Long, Alise Post make U.S. Olympic team after BMX Worlds medals