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Usain Bolt says brief pro soccer career was ‘fun while it lasted’

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Eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt‘s dabbling in pro soccer has come to a close.

Bolt, who set his sights on a soccer career following his retirement from track and field in 2017, told ESPN, “It was a good experience. I really enjoyed just being in a team and it was different from track and field and it was fun while it lasted.”

The Jamaican sprinting sensation has said his longtime dream – admittedly far-fetched – was to play for Manchester United. He spent time training with several clubs, including Borussia Dortmund, Stromsgodset in Norway, and Central Coast Mariners in Australia. He scored twice in a friendly match for the Mariners but the club announced in November it would not sign Bolt after failed negotiations.

The 32-year-old told ESPN his focus is now centered on his business ventures: “I’m just doing many different things…the sports life is over, so I’m now moving into different businesses, I have a lot of things in the pipeline, so as I say, I’m just dabbling in everything and trying to be a business man now.”

 

 

Boston Marathon not in Shalane Flanagan’s plan

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Shalane Flanagan, a four-time Olympian and 2017 New York City Marathon winner, said before and after the Boston Marathon in April that it would likely be her last time racing the world’s oldest annual 26.2-miler as an elite.

She’s sticking to that.

Flanagan’s name was noticeably absent from the U.S. elite entries for the 2019 Boston Marathon announced Tuesday.

“As of now, Shalane has no intentions of running Boston,” her husband said in an email Wednesday. “She’s just taking a break from running.”

Flanagan, 37 and a Massachusetts native, approached her three most recent marathons as if they could be her last.

She became the first U.S. female runner to win New York in 40 years in 2017. She placed seventh in Boston last April in miserable weather. Then she was third in her New York defense on Nov. 4, mouthing “I love you” and waving her right hand to the Central Park finish-line crowd.

“I just thought [in the final miles] if this truly is going to be my last race, a podium spot really would be special,” Flanagan said that day.

Flanagan could try to become the first U.S. distance runner to compete in five Olympics in 2020. At 39, she would be the third-oldest female U.S. Olympic runner after marathoners Colleen de Reuck (2004) and Francie Larrieu-Smith (1992), according to the OlyMADMen.

But Flanagan, the 2008 Olympic 10,000m silver medalist, hasn’t said whether she will enter the Tokyo trials on Feb. 29, 2020 in Atlanta.

“My heart is leaning towards serving others,” Flanagan, who as a training group teammate has helped Amy Cragg to a world bronze medal and Shelby Houlihan to the American record in the 5000m in the last two years, said Nov. 4. “It’s become swinging more in that direction than it is in my own running.”

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MORE: 2018 U.S. marathon rankings

Four sentenced for shooting that killed Tyson Gay’s daughter

Tyson Gay, Trinity Gay
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Four men who were found guilty in connection with the fatal shooting of 15-year-old Trinity Gay, the daughter of Olympian Tyson Gay, were sentenced Wednesday.

Authorities have said Gay was an innocent bystander who died in 2016 after being shot in the neck during a shootout in a Kentucky parking lot. A jury returned guilty verdicts Oct. 15.

On Wednesday, those four men received sentences, via NBC’s affiliate in Lexington:

  • Chaz Taylor: Twenty years for wanton murder and two years for wanton endangerment.
  • D’Vonta Middlebrooks: Fifteen years.
  • D’Markeo Taylor: Fifteen months (time served) and five years probation.
  • Lamonte Williams: One year (time served) and 15 months probation.

Middlebrooks, Taylor and Williams had all been found guilty of wanton endangerment.

“Me and Tyson have to go to the cemetery every single holiday, every birthday,” Trinity’s mom, Shoshana Boyd, told media after the sentencing.

Tyson Gay said after the October guilty verdicts that he was glad his daughter got some justice.

“This is my first time experiencing something like this, myself and the family,” he said then. “So it was pretty stressful, but I’m just glad it’s over. I’m just proud that my daughter got some justice. I hope that anyone else who loses a child to senseless violence, I hope they get justice also.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.