U.S. Track and Field Championships

2022 USATF Outdoor Championships results, world championships roster

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Results from the USA Track and Field Outdoor Championships, the qualifying meet for July’s world championships, also in Eugene, Oregon. Bolded names are on the world team. Up to three athletes can qualify per individual event, except the 100m and 400m, which can name more for relays. Due to world rankings and qualifying standards, the top three finishers do not always make the team. …

Women’s 100m
1. Melissa Jefferson — 10.69
2. Aleia Hobbs — 10.72
3. Twanisha Terry — 10.74
4. Tamari Davis — 10.78 (relay pool)
5. Tamara Clark — 10.82
6. Celera Barnes — 10.86 (relay pool)
DNS. Gabby Thomas (relay pool)

Women’s 200m
1. Abby Steiner — 21.77
2. Tamara Clark — 21.92
3. Jenna Prandini — 22.01
4. Cambrea Sturgis — 22.16
5. Brittany Brown — 22.22

Women’s 400m
1. Talitha Diggs — 50.22
2. Kendall Ellis — 50.35
3. Lynna Irby — 50.67
4. Wadeline Jonathas — 50.84 (relay pool)
5. Kennedy Simon — 50.90 (relay pool)
6. Allyson Felix — 51.30 (relay pool)
7. Jaide Stepter — 51.30 (relay pool)
8. Kaylin Whitney — 51.31 (relay pool)

Women’s 800m
1. Athing Mu — 1:57.16
2. Ajeé Wilson — 1:57.23
3. Raevyn Rogers — 1:57.96
4. Allie Wilson — 1:58.35
5. Olivia Baker — 1:58.63

Women’s 1500m
1. Sinclaire Johnson — 4:03.29
2. Cory McGee — 4:04.52
3. Elle St. Pierre — 4:05.14
4. Karissa Schweizer — 4:05.40
5. Heather MacLean — 4:06.40

Women’s 5000m
1. Elise Cranny — 15:49.15
2. Karissa Schweizer — 15:49.32
3. Emily Infeld — 15:49.42
4. Weini Kelati — 15:52.57
5. Natosha Rogers — 15:57.85

Women’s 10,000m (from May 27)
1. Karissa Schweizer — 30:49.56
2. Alicia Monson — 30:51.09
3. Natosha Rogers — 31:29.80
4. Emily Infeld — 31:30.04
5. Weini Kelati — 31:39.90

Women’s Marathon (team based on criteria)
Emma Bates
Keira D’Amato
Sara Hall
Molly Seidel made the team and withdrew. D’Amato replaced her.

Women’s 100m Hurdles
1. Keni Harrison — 12.34
2. Alaysha Johnson — 12.35
3. Alia Armstrong — 12.47
4. Tonea Marshall — 12.55
5. Tia Jones — 12.59
DNS. Nia Ali (has bye onto world team)

Women’s 400m Hurdles
1. Sydney McLaughlin — 51.41 WR
2. Britton Wilson — 53.08
3. Shamier Little — 53.92
4. Anna Cockrell — 53.98
5. Shannon Meisberger — 55.39
DNS. Dalilah Muhammad (has bye onto world team)

Women’s 3000m Steeplechase
1. Emma Coburn — 9:10.63
2. Courtney Wayment — 9:12.10
3. Courtney Frerichs — 9:16.18
4. Gabbi Jennings — 9:25.05
5. Katie Rainsberger — 9:29.77

Women’s Discus
1. Valarie Allman — 66.92 (has bye onto world team)
2. Laulauga Tausaga-Collins — 64.49
3. Rachel Dincoff — 62.14
4. Veronica Fraley — 59.90 (qualified via world ranking)
5. Shelby Frank — 57.20

Women’s Hammer
1. Brooke Andersen — 77.96 meters
2. Janee Kassanavoid — 76.04
3. Annette Echikunwoke — 73.76
4. DeAnna Price — 73.07 (has bye onto world team, declined spot)
5. Maggie Ewen — 72.70

Women’s High Jump
1. Vashti Cunningham — 1.93 meters
2. Rachel Glenn — 1.90 (qualified via world ranking)
3. Rachel McCoy — 1.90 (qualified via world ranking)
4. Inika McPherson — 1.87
5. Sanaa Barnes/Elizabeth Evans/Nyalaam Jok — 1.82

Women’s Javelin
1. Kara Winger — 64.26
2. Ariana Ince — 60.43 (qualified via world ranking)
3. Avione Allgood-Whetstone — 59.26 (doesn’t have standard)
4. Ashton Riner — 56.52 (doesn’t have standard)
5. Seri Geisler — 54.97 (doesn’t have standard)
NM. Maggie Malone (has standard)

Women’s Long Jump
1. Quanesha Burks — 7.06 meters (qualified via world ranking)

2. Jasmine Moore — 6.80
3. Tiffany Flynn — 6.69 (qualified via world ranking)

4. Monae’ Nichols — 6.58
5. Kate Hall — 6.52

Women’s Pole Vault
1. Sandi Morris — 4.82 meters
2. Alina McDonald — 4.65 (doesn’t have standard)
3. Katie Nageotte — 4.65
4. Gabriela Leon — 4.60 (qualified via world ranking)
5. Emily Grove — 4.60

Women’s Shot Put
1. Chase Ealey — 20.51 meters
2. Adelaide Aquilla — 19.45
3. Jessica Woodard — 19.40
4. Raven Saunders — 18.95
5. Maggie Ewen — 18.79 (has bye onto world team)

Women’s Triple Jump
1. Keturah Orji — 14.79
2. Tori Franklin — 14.59
3. Jasmine Moore — 14.15
4. Arianna Fisher — 13.63
5. Imani Oliver — 13.45

Women’s Heptathlon (from May 7)
1. Anna Hall — 6,458 points
2. Ashtin Mahler — 6,184 (qualified via world ranking)
3. Michelle Atherley — 6,154 (qualified via NACAC Championships)
4. Chari Hawkins — 6,031
5. Alissa Brooks-Johnson — 5,736
DNF. Kendell Williams (has bye onto world team)

Men’s 100m
1. Fred Kerley — 9.77
2. Marvin Bracy-Williams — 9.85
3. Trayvon Bromell — 9.88
4. Micah Williams — 9.90
5. Elijah Hall-Thompson — 9.90 (relay pool)
6. Kyree King — 9.96 (relay pool)
DNS. Christian Coleman (has bye onto world team)
DNS. Josephus Lyles (relay pool)

Men’s 200m
1. Noah Lyles — 19.67
2. Erriyon Knighton — 19.69
3. Fred Kerley — 19.83
4. Kenny Bednarek — 19.87
5. Josephus Lyles — 19.93

Men’s 400m
1. Michael Norman — 43.56
2. Champion Allison — 43.70
3. Randolph Ross — 44.17
4. Elija Godwin — 44.34 (relay pool)
5. Vernon Norwood — 44.35 (relay pool)
6. Bryce Deadmon — 44.54 (relay pool)
7. Noah Williams — 45.04 (relay pool)
8. Ismail Turner — 45.56 (relay pool)

Men’s 800m
1. Bryce Hoppel — 1:44.60
2. Jonah Koech — 1:44.74
3. Brandon Miller — 1:45.19
4. Clayton Murphy — 1:45.23
5. Baylor Franklin — 1:45.65
DNS. Donavan Brazier (has bye onto world team)

Men’s 1500m
1. Cooper Teare — 3:45.86
2. Jonathan Davis — 3:46.01 (doesn’t have standard)
3. Josh Thompson — 3:46.07 (qualified via world rankings)
4. Eric Holt — 3:46.15 (doesn’t have standard)
5. Reed Brown — 3:46.28 (doesn’t have standard)
6. Johnny Gregorek — 3:46.36 (has standard)

Men’s 5000m
1. Grant Fisher — 13:03.84
2. Woody Kincaid — 13:06.70
3. Abdihamid Nur — 13:08.63
4. Connor Mantz — 13:11.81
5. Emmanuel Bor — 13:13.15

Men’s 10,000m (from May 27)
1. Joe Klecker — 28:28.71

2. Grant Fisher — 28:28.81
3. Sean McGorty — 28:29.57
4. Dillon Maggard — 28:30.75
5. Shadrack Kipchirchir — 28:30.79

Men’s Marathon (team based on criteria)
Elkanah Kibet
Colin Mickow
Galen Rupp

Men’s 110m Hurdles
1. Daniel Roberts — 13.03
2. Trey Cunningham — 13.08
3. Devon Allen — 13.09
4. Jamal Britt — 13.09
5. Freddie Crittenden — 13.14
DNS. Grant Holloway (has bye onto world team)

Men’s 400m Hurdles
1. Rai Benjamin — 47.04
2. Trevor Bassitt — 47.47
3. Khallifah Rosser — 47.65
4. CJ Allen — 48.17
5. Quincy Hall — 48.33

Men’s 3000m Steeplechase
1. Hillary Bor — 8:15.76
2. Evan Jager — 8:17.29
3. Benard Keter — 8:19.16
4. Duncan Hamilton — 8:20.23
5. Anthony Rotich — 8:23.15

Men’s Discus
1. Andrew Evans — 63.31 meters
2. Dallin Shurts — 62.32 (doesn’t have standard)
3. Sam Mattis — 62.25
4. Reggie Jagers — 62.16 (doesn’t have standard)
5. Brian Williams — 62.12 (has standard)

Men’s Hammer
1. Daniel Haugh — 80.18
2. Rudy Winkler — 78.33
3. Alex Young — 76.60 (qualified via world ranking)
4. Morgan Shigo — 75.53
5. Israel Oloyede — 75.10

Men’s High Jump
1. Shelby McEwen — 2.33 meters
2. JuVaughn Harrison — 2.30
3. Dontavious Hill — 2.22 (doesn’t have standard)
4. Darius Carbin — 2.22 (qualified via world ranking)
5. Kyle Rollins — 2.22

Men’s Javelin
1. Ethan Dabbs — 81.29 meters (qualified via world ranking)
2. Curtis Thompson — 80.49 (qualified via world ranking)
3. Marc Minichello — 79.05 (doesn’t have standard)
4. Capers Williamson — 77.16 (doesn’t have standard)
5. Tim Glover — 76.37 (qualified via world ranking)

Men’s Long Jump
1. Rayvon Gray — 8.19 meters (doesn’t have standard)
2. Steffin McCarter — 8.15 (qualified via world ranking)
3. Jeremiah Davis — 8.11 (doesn’t have standard)
4. Will Williams — 8.07 (qualified via world ranking)
5. A’Nan Bridgett — 8.03 (doesn’t have standard)
10. Marquis Dendy — 7.87 (has standard)
12. Matthew Boling — 7.78 (has standard)

Men’s Pole Vault
1. Chris Nilsen — 5.70 meters
2. Luke Winder — 5.70 (qualified via world ranking)
3. Andrew Irwin — 5.60
4. Jacob Wooten — 5.60
5. KC Lightfoot — 5.60
5. Matt Ludwig — 5.60

Men’s Shot Put
1. Ryan Crouser — 23.12 meters
2. Joe Kovacs — 22.87 (has bye onto world team)
3. Josh Awotunde — 21.51
4. Tripp Piperi — 21.43
5. Roger Steen — 21.14

Men’s Triple Jump
1. Donald Scott — 17.07 meters
2. Will Claye — 16.93
3. Chris Benard — 16.83 (qualified via world ranking)
4. Russell Robinson — 16.65 (doesn’t have standard)
5. Christian Taylor — 16.54 (has bye onto world team)
7. Chris Carter — 16.41 (has standard)

Men’s Decathlon (from May 7)
1. Garrett Scantling — 8,867 points
2. Kyle Garland — 8,720
3. Zach Ziemek — 8,573
4. Steven Bastien — 8,135
5. Hunter Price — 7,897

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Noah Lyles runs down Erriyon Knighton as rivalry buds at USATF Championships

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Noah Lyles reasserted that he is the U.S. 200m king by running down 18-year-old phenom Erriyon Knighton at the USA Track and Field Outdoor Championships.

The reigning world champion Lyles won in 19.67 seconds, celebrating moments before crossing the finish line two hundredths ahead of Knighton, who tightened up in the final meters. Lyles looked toward Knighton’s lane (and the scoreboard), smiled and pointed.

“I saw him reach his top speed, and I said mine’s faster,” Lyles told Lewis Johnson on NBC while standing next to Knighton at Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon.

Knighton, who also qualified for the world championships in three weeks, also in Eugene, then said, “Job’s not finished. It’s never finished,” and walked out of the joint interview that also included third-place Fred Kerley.

Later Sunday, Lyles clarified that the celebration was not meant to show up Knighton.

“It was for everyone who keeps counting me out just because a new player has entered the ring,” he posted on social media, also noting that people doubted him and brought up Knighton running 19.49 seconds on April 30, one hundredth better than Lyles’ personal best. “Erriyon is an incredible talent and he has proven that. But that don’t mean I’m just going to lay down and die!”

USATF OUTDOORS: Results

Sha’Carri Richardson missed the world championships team. After a shock elimination in the 100m first round on Thursday, she was eliminated in the 200m semifinals on Sunday.

“I feel like I ain’t done, and I’m the queen,” Richardson said.

NCAA champion Abby Steiner won the women’s 200m final in 21.77 seconds, which was the world’s best time in 2022 until Shericka Jackson won the Jamaican trials in 21.55, the third-best time in history.

Olympic bronze medalist Gabby Thomas was eighth, missing the team, then said she learned she had a grade two hamstring tear two weeks ago.

Daniel Roberts captured the 110m hurdles in 13.03 after reigning world champion Grant Holloway scratched out of the final, his world spot already assured. Devon Allen, who two weeks ago ran the third-fastest time in history (12.84), placed third to get the last spot on the world team by three thousandths of a second.

Chase Ealey won the shot put with the second-best throw in American history — 20.51 meters. American record holder Michelle Carter, who in 2016 became the first U.S. Olympic women’s shot put champion, finished eighth in her last nationals before retirement. Raven Saunders, the Tokyo Olympic silver medalist, missed the team by one spot.

As expected, Olympic champion Athing Mu topped the 800m. Ajeé Wilson nearly did the unexpected, coming seven hundredths shy of handing Mu her first 800m defeat since 2019. Raevyn Rogers grabbed the last world spot as the Olympic team repeats.

Emma Coburn won an eighth consecutive national title in the 3000m steeplechase, extending the longest active streak in any event, and 10th overall.

Coburn, who earned a medal of every color among the 2016 Olympics and 2017 and 2019 Worlds, is again joined on the national team by Courtney Frerichs, who took silver in Tokyo. Frerichs, who was second at nationals in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2021, dropped to third behind Courtney Wayment.

Olympic silver medalist Rai Benjamin took the 400m hurdles in 47.08 seconds, the fastest time in the world this year. He may be headed toward another showdown with world record holder Karsten Warholm of Norway at worlds, though Warholm suffered a hamstring injury in his lone race this year on June 5.

Clayton Murphy, the 2016 Olympic 800m bronze medalist, missed the world team by four hundredths to a diving Brandon Miller. Olympian Bryce Hoppel won the 800m, followed by Jonah Koech and Miller, who are going to their first worlds. Donavan Brazier has a bye onto the team as reigning world champion.

Grant Fisher earned his first national title, taking the 5000m after placing second in the 5000m and 10,000m at Olympic Trials. He’s joined on the world team by Olympic teammate Woody Kincaid and Abdihamid Nur, a rising Northern Arizona junior who was born in Somalia.

Paul Chelimo, silver and bronze medalist at the last two Olympics, was 11th and will miss his first global championship since 2015.

Elise Cranny repeated as U.S. 5000m champion. She’s joined on the team by Karissa Schweizer, who qualified for the 5000m and 10,000m as she did last year, and Emily Infeld, the 2015 World 10,000m bronze medalist who made her first global championships team since 2017. The three were separated by 27 hundredths.

Shelby McEwen relegated Olympic teammate and favorite JuVaughn Harrison to second in the high jump.

The track and field season continues with a Diamond League stop in Stockholm on Thursday, live on Peacock.

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Sydney McLaughlin breaks world record at USATF Champs; Allyson Felix set for worlds

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Sydney McLaughlin broke the world record in the 400m hurdles for the third time in the last year, this time at the USA Track and Field Outdoor Championships.

The Olympic champion clocked 51.41 seconds in Eugene, Oregon, bettering her previous record of 51.46 from the Olympics. In all, McLaughlin has brought the record down from 52.16 in the last year.

“Anything is possible any time I step on the track,” said McLaughlin, who planned to celebrate by eating “some real food besides vegetables,” such as a cheeseburger or pancakes. “The goal is to improve upon myself and push the limits.”

McLaughlin’s legendary coach, Bob Kersee, said that McLaughlin is going to eventually turn to the flat 400m and chase that (37-year-old) world record, perhaps after capping this season with a world title in three weeks, NBC Sports analyst Ato Boldon said. For now, McLaughlin’s sights are on those worlds, also in Eugene, where she will bid to complete her collection with a first world title.

“I’m just learning the race in general. As I’ve progressed over the years I’ve learned the 400m hurdles,” she said. “It’s a really cool feeling to actually have a race plan going in instead of just going out and running.”

USATF OUTDOORS: TV Schedule | Results

Also Saturday, the farewelling Allyson Felix likely clinched a spot on her 10th and final world championships team by placing sixth in the 400m. Talitha Diggs, whose Olympian mom competed at her last nationals the year before Felix competed in her first nationals, won to qualify for worlds in three weeks, also in Eugene.

“Happy that I don’t have any more open 400s ever,” said Felix, adding that she wants to run the mixed-gender 4x400m relay at worlds and would do the women’s 4x400m if asked. “I went to come here and give it my all, try to get in position for a relay and was able to get that done. Can’t complain.”

Michael Norman took the men’s 400m in 43.56, bettering his own fastest time in the world this year. Norman was the world’s fastest 400m runner in the last Olympic cycle but earned zero individual medals between worlds and the Olympics. Surprise runner-up Champion Allison improved his personal best from 44.29 to 43.70.

Keni Harrison, the Olympic 100m hurdles silver medalist and world record holder, won in 12.35, supplanting Olympic gold medalist Jasmine Camacho-Quinn of Puerto Rico as fastest in the world this year. Harrison edged Alaysha Johnson by one hundredth. Nia Ali didn’t start the final but has a bye onto the world team as reigning champ.

Rio Olympic silver medalist Evan Jager, who up until April went nearly four years between completing 3000m steeplechases due to injuries, took second and earned the time standard to make the world team.

“It’s been a real hard, long journey to build back my body and my confidence,” Jager, 33, told Lewis Johnson on NBC. “I’m really proud of myself.”

Sinclaire Johnson won the women’s 1500m in 4:03.29 to make her first world team. She’s joined by Olympic finalists Cory McGee and Elle St. Pierre.

Former Oregon Duck Cooper Teare took the men’s 1500m in the absence of two other former Ducks — 2016 Olympic champion Matthew Centrowitz (knee surgery) and Olympic Trials champion Cole Hocker (eliminated in first round). Teare missed the Olympic 5000m team by one spot.

All of the favorites advanced out of the 200m first round — world champion Noah Lyles (who has an automatic spot on the world team), 18-year-old Erriyon Knighton, Fred Kerley and Olympic bronze medalist Gabby Thomas, Sha’Carri Richardson and Abby Steiner.

Likewise in the 110m hurdles (world champion Grant Holloway and Devon Allen).

The semifinals and finals in those events are Sunday.

Olympic silver medalist Chris Nilsen won the pole vault with a 5.70-meter clearance. Sam Kendricks scratched but can still compete at worlds via waiver as reigning world champion.

Kara Winger won her ninth U.S. javelin title and qualified for her sixth world team by hitting the qualifying standard on her last throw in her last national championships before retiring.

Maggie Malone, the world No. 1 this year, fouled on all three of her throws. She could still go to worlds, though, since she is one of two U.S. women with the qualifying standard.

ON HER TURF: Allyson Felix on Roe v. Wade

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