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Reno-Tahoe drops 2030 Winter Olympic bid

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If the U.S. bids for the 2030 Winter Olympics, it will not be with Reno-Tahoe.

The Nevada/California region ended its pursuit of becoming a U.S. bid city, at least for an Olympics in the near future. The U.S. is expected to bid for 2030, and the U.S. Olympic Committee last year named Reno-Tahoe, Denver and Salt Lake City as cities that expressed interest.

“We have maintained from the start that a Reno-Tahoe bid would have to make sense economically, environmentally and socially,” Brian Krolicki, chairman of the Reno Tahoe Winter Games Coalition, said in a press release. “Given the parameters and conditions presented, we cannot make the numbers pass muster. To continue, at this point, would be untenable and unwise.”

The coalition noted the Los Angeles 2028 Summer Games having exclusive Olympic marketing rights from 2019 through its Closing Ceremony as an obstacle.

The region hosted the 1960 Winter Games in Squaw Valley, Calif. Since, the U.S. has hosted two Winter Olympics — in Lake Placid in 1980 and Salt Lake City in 2002. It hasn’t hosted a Summer or Winter Games since, its longest drought since the 28-year gap between 1932 and 1960.

The International Olympic Committee vote in 2019 to choose the 2026 Winter Olympic host city could impact a potential U.S. 2030 bid. The remaining 2026 bidders are Calgary, Stockholm and an Italian bid with Milan and Cortina d’Ampezzo.

Calgary’s bid hinges on a public vote Tuesday. North America has never hosted back-to-back Winter Olympics.

Olympic host cities are traditionally chosen seven years beforehand.

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USOC seeks to revoke USA Gymnastics as national governing body

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The U.S. Olympic Committee is seeking to shut down USA Gymnastics in the wake of the Larry Nassar sexual-abuse crimes and several leadership changes.

“You deserve better,” USOC CEO Sarah Hirshland wrote in an open letter to the U.S. gymnastics community, two days after the world championships concluded.

Hirshland wrote that a review panel will be identified, a hearing will be held, a report will be issued, a recommendation will be made regarding USA Gymnastics’ status as a national governing body and the USOC board will vote, without detailing a timeline.

“You might be asking why now?” wrote Hirshland, who in July was named the USOC’s first permanent female CEO. “The short answer is that we believe the challenges facing the organization are simply more than it is capable of overcoming in its current form. We have worked closely with the new USAG board over recent months to support them, but despite diligent effort, the NGB continues to struggle. And that’s not fair to gymnasts around the country. Even weeks ago, I hoped there was a different way forward. But we now believe that is no longer possible.

“This is a situation in which there are no perfect solutions.”

USA Gymnastics’ board of directors said in a statement that it is “evaluating the best path forward for our athletes, professional members, the organization and staff” after the USOC issued a letter to USA Gymnastics initiating the complaint.

“USA Gymnastics’ board was seated in June 2018 and inherited an organization in crisis with significant challenges that were years in the making,” the statement read. “In the four months since, the Board has done everything it could to move this organization towards a better future. We immediately took steps to change the leadership and are currently conducting a search to find a CEO who can rebuild the organization and, most importantly, regain the trust of the gymnastics community. Substantial work remains — in particular, working with the plaintiffs and USA Gymnastics’ insurers to resolve the ongoing litigation as quickly as possible. We will continue to prioritize our athletes’ health and safety and focus on acting in the best interests of the greater gymnastics community.”

Hirshland called for changes in USA Gymnastics leadership on Aug. 31, not a month into her new role.

“Under the circumstances, we feel that the organization is struggling to manage its obligations effectively and it is time to consider making adjustments in the leadership,” she said then, adding that the USOC would be reaching out to the USAG board to discuss changes.

USA Gymnastics is without a CEO after Mary Bono resigned Oct. 16, four days after being appointed to the role.

Bono replaced Kerry Perry, who resigned after Hirshland’s August comments. Bono received criticism for a September photo of herself drawing over a Nike logo on a golf shoe tweeted from her account shortly after Nike debuted its advertising campaign featuring former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Notably, Olympic all-around champion Simone Biles tweeted of Bono, “*mouth drop* don’t worry, it’s not like we needed a smarter usa gymnastics president or any sponsors or anything.” Nike is one of Biles’ sponsors.

Biles is among the more than 200 women who have come forward over the last two years claiming they were sexually abused by former team doctor Nassar under the guise of treatment. Biles was critical of Perry, who replaced Steve Penny, for not being vocal enough in support of the survivors.

“Gymnastics as a sport will remain a bedrock for the Olympic community in the United States,” Hirshland wrote. “We will ensure support for the Olympic hopefuls who may represent us in Tokyo in 2020.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Senator suggests possible end of USOC’s tax-exempt status

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A senator floated the idea of revoking the U.S. Olympic Committee’s tax-exempt status if it fails to effectively combat the sex-abuse problem in Olympic sports.

At a hearing Wednesday, Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Connecticut, said the USOC’s tax-exempt status and antitrust exemption could be at risk when Congress revisits the law that governs the federation.

Blumenthal also suggested the position of athlete advocate and inspector general be added to the USOC. The federation has an athletes’ ombudsman position and recently revealed plans to give athletes more-accessible avenues to report abuse and other wrongdoing.

Leaders of four Olympic sports federations — figure skating, bobsled, weightlifting and swimming — appeared in front of a Senate subcommittee in the latest in a series of hearings to discuss their response to the sex-abuse crisis.

Blumenthal suggested Congress would make revisions in the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act to “make sure the USOC is held to a higher standard of accountability.”

The USOC does not receive government funding and is a nonprofit, which makes it exempt from taxes. Judges also have ruled that the Ted Stevens Act has given the USOC antitrust immunity. Revoking the USOC’s tax-exempt status could potentially take a huge chunk out of an operation that brought in $336 million during the last Olympic year (2016) and uses much of that to provide assistance to athletes, either directly or through sports federations that train them.

As part of her first address to the U.S. Olympic family, new USOC CEO Sarah Hirshland said last month that athletes needed to be better represented in the decision-making process in Olympic sports.

Blumenthal grasped on that idea and asked the sports leaders if they’d be willing to increase athlete representation on boards and committees to 50 percent or more; the general standard is about 20 percent. But he was met with resistance.

“It comes down to the competence of the board,” said USA Bobsled and Skeleton CEO Darrin Steele. “A competing athlete is looking at four-year increments, and it’s difficult to think about long-term strategy when you’re actually in midst of the competition.”

US Figure Skating president Anne Cammett agreed.

“Part of what you have to look at is the learning and life experiences that come with developing from a young person to an adult,” she said. “I think you need a good balance of life experience and knowledge.”

Cammett piggybacked on Blumenthal’s calls for change, saying the U.S. Center for SafeSport, established to investigate abuse cases in Olympic sports, needs more funding and would also benefit from subpoena power to conduct its investigations.

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