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U.S. swim team qualifiers for 2019 World Championships

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U.S. pool qualifiers for the 2019 World Swimming Championships in Gwangju, South Korea in July. Swimmers qualified via best times from finals between 2018 Nationals and the Pan Pacific Championships, but the official roster has not been named yet … 

Women
Kathleen Baker — 100 back, 200 back, 200 IM
Mallory Comerford — 100 free
Kelsi Dahlia — 50 fly, 100 fly
Gabby DeLoof — 4×200 free
Katie Drabot — 200 fly
Hali Flickinger — 200 fly
Brooke Forde — 400 IM
Margo Geer — 4×100 free
Lilly King — 50 breast, 100 breast, 200 breast
Katie Ledecky — 200 free, 400 free, 800 free, 1500 free
Simone Manuel — 50 free, 100 free, 4×200 free
Melanie Margalis — 200 IM, 4×200 free
Ally McHugh — 400 IM
Katie McLaughlin — 100 fly
Katie Meili — 100 breast (declined spot to focus on law school)
Lia Neal — 4×100 free
Allison Schmitt — 200 free
Leah Smith — 400 free, 800 free, 4×200 free
Regan Smith — 200 back
Olivia Smoliga — 50 back, 100 back
Micah Sumrall — 100 breast, 200 breast
Ashley Twichell — 1500 free
Abbey Weitzeil — 50 free, 4×100 free

Men
Michael Andrew — 50 free, 50 breast, 100 breast, 50 fly
Nathan Adrian — 4×100 free
Zach Apple — 4×100 free, 4×200 free
Michael Chadwick — 4×100 free
Jack Conger — 100 fly
Abrahm Devine — 200 IM
Caeleb Dressel — 50 free, 100 free, 100 fly
Conor Dwyer — 4×200 free
Matt Grevers — 100 back
Zane Grothe — 400 free, 800 free, 1500 free
Townley Haas — 200 free
Zach Harting — 200 fly
Chase Kalisz — 200 IM, 400 IM
Jack Levant — 4×200 free
Jay Litherland — 400 IM
Ryan Murphy — 50 back, 100 back, 200 back
Jacob Pebley — 200 back
Blake Pieroni — 100 free, 4×200 free
Josh Prenot — 200 breast
Andrew Seliskar — 200 free
Grant Shoults — 400 free
Jordan Wilimovsky — 800 free, 1500 free
Andrew Wilson — 100 breast, 200 breast
Justin Wright — 200 fly

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MORE: Mental health on swimmers’ minds at nationals

Five takeaways from World Swimming Championships

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Five thoughts following the World Swimming Championships in Budapest …

1. This is the most dominant U.S. swim team in nearly 50 years

The U.S. won 38 medals (most by one nation at a single worlds in history), with 18 golds, in the Duna Arena pool. But that’s not the full extent of the Americans’ grip on the sport.

Look at the rest of the medal standings. No other nation won more than 10 medals or four golds in Budapest. That’s also a world championships first (and hasn’t happened at the Olympics since 1968). Proof that the distance separating the U.S. and the second-best swim nation is greater than ever in the worlds era (since 1973).

No question the pool of reputable swimming nations is as strong as ever, but the increased competition impacted everybody except the U.S. in Budapest. Same in Rio, where the U.S. had its best Olympics since 1972.

The breadth of this U.S. team is also extraordinary. Its individual gold medalists in Budapest are from Stanford via Maryland (Katie Ledecky) and Texas (Simone Manuel), Florida (Caeleb Dressel), Indiana (Lilly King) and Georgia via Maryland (Chase Kalisz).

The U.S. won all but one relay at worlds, its best total effort there since 1978. It put swimmers in every final save two. It won three open-water medals.

And it had zero combined medals from Michael PhelpsRyan Lochte and Missy Franklin, who not too long ago carried the program.

2. Katie Ledecky’s times were surprising; her medal haul was superlative

Ledecky’s performance in Budapest is not a simple dissection. Olympic sports are judged on medals above all else. In that sense, Ledecky had the meet of her life — five golds and one silver.

But in swimming, times are also newsworthy (world records, personal bests, relay splits, etc.). If you watched the USA Swimming National Championships last month, you saw Ledecky incredibly clock within a second of her combined pool time in finals at the 2016 Olympic Trials. Then you heard Ledecky say she was less tapered for nationals than she was for trials.

All this after what had to be the most exhausting year of her life, the Rio Games followed by enrolling at Stanford, changing coaches and completing a full NCAA season through March.

Overall, Ledecky was slightly slower at worlds than at nationals. Which was definitely a surprise and noteworthy. Swimmers train to peak for major international meets. Ledecky has a history of time drops at the Olympics and worlds, lowering world records multiple times in 2013, 2015 and 2016.

Did it matter that Ledecky broke no records in Budapest? No. She won all of her distance events easily and was part of two winning relay teams.

Then there’s the 200m freestyle. Ledecky suffered her first major loss there. However, she had the fastest 200m free time of the meet. It just so happened to come in the semifinals.

3. Caeleb Dressel is now on world-record watch

By now you know Dressel won seven golds in Budapest, including three on Saturday alone. Let’s take a closer look at his times.

In the 100m freestyle, Dressel lowered his personal best from 47.91 (Rio Olympics) to 47.17. In the 100m butterfly, from 50.87 (2017 Nationals) to 49.86. In the 50m freestyle, from 21.53 (2017 Nationals) to 21.15.

If Dressel can drop his times by about half as much in the next year (or by the end of his career), he will break all three world records. Those three records were set in the high-tech suit era to boot.

There’s little reason to think Dressel won’t get faster. He’s the same age as Ledecky (20) and, unlike Ledecky, races the shorter distances that more favor veterans. Cesar Cielo was 22 when he set the 50m and 100m free world records in 2009. Michael Phelps was 24 when he set the 100m fly mark.

As for the Phelps-medal-haul comparisons, keep in mind that one of Dressel’s golds came in a mixed relay that is not on the Olympic program. Dressel’s other individual event at worlds, where he finished fourth, was the 50m butterfly. Also not on the Olympic program. He could tack on another event in the 4x200m free relay, but the Phelpsian eight golds at an Olympics is not yet in Dressel’s range.

4. The world’s best swimmer is …

How about Sweden’s Sarah Sjöström? She won three events and broke the world record in a fourth, giving her four individual world records, the most of any male or female swimmer in the current record book.

Sjöström was one of three female headliners at this meet, and you could argue she had the best overall performance considering expectations. Ledecky also won three individual golds but had that 200m free defeat and no personal bests. Katinka Hosszu swept the individual medleys, but also no personal bests.

5. Looking ahead to 2018

Next year is the one year in the Olympic cycle where the world’s best swimmers are divided into two major international meets — the European Championships and, for all other nations, the Pan Pacific Championships in Tokyo in August. No Olympics. No worlds.

Ledecky will presumably not face her toughest international rivals at Pan Pacs — no Sjöström, no Federica Pellegrini, the Italian who beat her in Budapest. Maybe no Li Bingjie, the Chinese 15-year-old who cut five seconds off her personal best to finish two seconds behind Ledecky in the 800m free. China has a history of not sending its best swimmers to Pan Pacs.

At Pan Pacs, Dressel could face the 2016 Olympic 100m freestyle champion, Australian Kyle Chalmers, who missed worlds after heart surgery. In the 100m butterfly, Olympic champion Joseph Schooling of Singapore and 2013 and 2015 world champion Chad le Clos of South Africa are also eligible for Pan Pacs.

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Lilly King, Yulia Efimova finish swim worlds with truce

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BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Call it Detente by the Danube.

It seems American swimmer Lilly King has made peace with Russia’s Yulia Efimova.

On the last day of the world championships on Sunday, Efimova and King shared an embrace after King set a world record in the 50m breaststroke final.

Heck, they even seemed to share a joke in a very convivial moment before they left the pool — on the same side.

It would have been unthinkable before, as King frequently needled Efimova with blunt comments about the Russian’s doping violations.

King and Efimova took turns wagging their fingers at each other at the Rio Olympics last year, when King said “I did it clean” after winning their 100m breast showdown.

The rivalry became swimming’s Cold War, but the first sign of a thaw in relations came at the worlds on Friday, when U.S. swimmer Bethany Galat hugged Efimova after the Russian won the 200m breast ahead of King.

“I don’t know her personally, but she won a gold medal and I think her time was incredible,” said Galat, who claimed the bronze. “She’s a heck of a swimmer, a heck of a breaststroker. I mean, she won, of course I’m going to congratulate her.”

King has let her swimming do the talking this week, with world records in the 50m and 100m breast. She also helped the U.S. women to a world record in the medley relay Sunday, four days after playing her part in a world record in the mixed medley relay

“Four world records, so pretty happy with that,” the 20-year-old from Indiana said. “The relay records were kind of the cherry on top. The individual records were definitely something I’ve been looking forward towards since Rio.”

King acknowledged that her relationship with Efimova had improved, though she stressed that the rivalry remained.

“We’re obviously not best friends. We’re rivals, but I always have a good time racing her and it’s definitely been a lot more civil than we were last year, so I’m enjoying that,” King said.

The two swimmers used to make a concerted effort to avoid even eye contact after races, but that all changed after King’s blistering 29.40 in the 50m breast. She smiled sheepishly upon seeing her time, while Efimova put her hand to her mouth and then went over to congratulate the American.

“What happened in a competition before doesn’t matter,” said Efimova, who was clearly happy with her silver medal. She finished with one gold, two silvers and one bronze.

“Today she loved racing me because it makes her faster and me faster, too. And it’s more interesting for sport to watch,” Efimova added.

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