Yevgeny Plushenko

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Yevgeny Plushenko makes PyeongChang predictions, talks figure skating evolution

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Yevgeny Plushenko, understandably, is quite pleased with what men’s figure skating looks like these days.

The Russian great, who helped usher in the quadruple jump era, watched at the season-opening Grand Prix event in Moscow as the last four men to skate each attempted at least three quads in their long programs.

“I’m so happy,” Plushenko told NBC Olympics’ Rachel Lutz in a sitdown interview Monday. “Because you remember 2010, nobody landed quads [other than me]. Not one. Nobody. I landed only myself, I landed short program and long program, and I lost [to American Evan Lysacek at the Vancouver Olympics]. You know? I would like to say for these such great athletes – men’s skaters – they move figure skating way forward. Right now, all quadruples. Nathan Chen, first skater ever [to do] five quadruples [in one program]. That’s awesome. That’s great, because figure skating, yes it’s theater, this is ballet, musical, yea? But of course it’s sport. That’s extreme, the sport is quadruples. So I’m grateful they move forward, way forward.”

Plushenko made a rare trip to the U.S. to perform in an ice show at Chelsea Piers in New York City, his first on-ice appearance in the States in 11 years.

Not everyone is thrilled with the quad arms race in men’s skating. Notably, three-time world champion Patrick Chan. But Plushenko has always commanded attention.

The Russian is one of two skaters in any discipline to earn four Olympic medals. He announced his retirement on March 31 at age 34.

Plushenko, whose last competition was the Sochi 2014 team event, now coaches Sochi women’s singles gold medalist Adelina Sotnikova, who will not defend her title in PyeongChang.

As for active skaters, Plushenko tapped Japanese Yuzuru Hanyu for gold.

That would mean Hanyu would accomplish the feat that Plushenko coveted in 2010 — becoming the first repeat Olympic men’s champion since Dick Button in 1952.

“[Hanyu] don’t need five quads, six quads,” Plushenko said, referencing the number of four-revolution jumps the likes of teenagers Chen and Shoma Uno are planning in free skates. “He need three quadruples. Maybe two [Salchows] and one toe loop. And that’s it.”

Hanyu has the total package that would allow him to win with fewer quads. If he skates clean.

Plushenko also liked Chen, Uno and two-time world champion Javier Fernandez of Spain as Olympic podium contenders.

“[Chen has] great, great, great, great technique,” Plushenko said. “So four, four skaters can be on the podium.”

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Yevgeny Plushenko to coach Adelina Sotnikova

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Yevgeny Plushenko wasn’t able to win back-to-back Olympic gold medals. Maybe he can coach a skater to the feat instead.

Plushenko, who announced his retirement on Friday, has started coaching Sochi Olympic champion Adelina Sotnikova, according to Russian media.

“We began cooperation with Adelina, however, this is all I can say at the present moment,” Plushenko said Tuesday, according to Russian news agency TASS.

The news comes one day after Plushenko posted on Instagram that he planned to return to the Olympics as a coach. Russian media reported Plushenko will detail his future in a press conference Wednesday.

Sotnikova, 20, hasn’t competed since the December 2015 Russian Championships, where she finished sixth and failed to make the three-woman Russian team for the world championships.

She didn’t compete at all this season, stopping preseason training due to a health issue and opting to perform in less-demanding ice shows, according to Russian media.

Russian women’s figure skating has grown in Sotnikova’s absence, complicating her path to making the 2018 Olympic team.

Five different Russian women have won world championships medals the last three years, including two-time reigning world champion Yevgenia Medvedeva.

Russia has three women’s spots at the 2018 Olympics.

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I'll be back to The Olympic Games as a coach, I promise my friends! Sport is my life and always in my heart! 💪🏻💪🏻💪🏻 Repost @olympicchannel ・・・ It's official. No more comeback for Russia's figure skating legend 🇷🇺⛸️ @plushenkoofficial. But your remarkable performance will never be forgotten! . . #ThankYou #Olympics #OlympicGames #FigureSkating #isufigureskating#FigureSkater #Skater #Skating #IceSkating #IceRink #rink #ice #sports #sport #fit #fun #fans #action #icedance #skates #iceskates #patinajeartístico #patinageartistique #фигурноекатание #フィギュアスケート #피겨스케이팅 @isufigureskating @russian_olympic_team

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Yevgeny Plushenko rules out Olympic comeback, retires

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Russian Yevgeny Plushenko announced his retirement from competitive figure skating, more than three years after the four-time Olympic medalist’s last competitive skate.

“As for me, I won’t go [to the 2018 Olympics] as an athlete,” Plushenko said on Russian TV on Friday, according to a Russian news agency TASS translation. “I have wrapped up my skating career. I’m opening my own academy where I will work as a coach. If we together with the athletes manage to prepare for the Olympics, maybe I will come.”

Plushenko, 34, last competed at the Sochi Olympics, taking team event gold and withdrawing from singles after his short program warm-up due to a back injury.

Plushenko had announced his retirement in Sochi but went back on that claim later in the Winter Games.

“If need be, I’ll have another 10 operations … I’m not ruling out that I’ll go for a fifth Olympic Games,” he reportedly said in February 2014. “I am not ruling out that I want stay in sports, to prove [something] to many [people] and myself.”

Plushenko was re-added to the Russian national team but never competed, though he has done many ice shows. He has undergone back and neck surgeries in recent years.

“I look at how the youth has grown up and men’s figure skating as well, it is now impossible to compete with young [athletes] it seems to me,” Plushenko said, according to TASS. “I have undergone 15 surgeries, and it is difficult to take part in my fifth Olympics, I’m fed up with it.”

Plushenko had perhaps the greatest career in men’s modern skating. He is one of only two skaters in any discipline to earn four Olympic medals, the other being Swede Gillis Grafstrom of the 1920s and ’30s.

He burst onto the scene with a bronze medal at the 1998 World Championships at age 15, after just missing the 1998 Nagano Olympic team.

Under the guidance of coach Alexei Mishin, Plushenko blossomed into a world champion in 2001 and Olympic silver medalist behind Russian rival Alexei Yagudin in 2002.

In 2006, Plushenko came to the Olympics with a personal-best score more than 20 points higher than any other skater under the new judging system. He delivered on that massive-favorite status by winning gold in Torino by a whopping 27.12 points.

Plushenko returned after three seasons off, largely due to knee injuries and surgeries, for the 2010 Olympic season. He won the short program in Vancouver but was surpassed by American Evan Lysacek in the free skate and had to take silver, beaten by a man who didn’t attempt a quadruple jump.

Plushenko barely competed the next four seasons leading up to his global competition return at the Sochi Winter Games. He was awarded Russia’s lone men’s singles spot despite being beaten at the Russian Championships.

In Sochi, Plushenko’s total score in the team event — 259.59 — would have earned bronze in the singles event that he skipped.

Plushenko’s bravado was unmistakable. Perhaps the best illustration was the title for his final competitive performance, “Best of Plushenko,” a free-skate compilation in Sochi commemorating the highlights of his career.

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