Canyon Barry
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Canyon Barry stars for U.S. in 3×3 basketball, decades after Hall of Fame dad’s Olympic regret

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A little over a year ago, Canyon Barry wasn’t thinking at all about 3×3 basketball, but USA Basketball was definitely thinking of him.

Since, Barry went 0-4 in his first set of 3×3 games, observed by USA Basketball officials. He broke a fibula. He also rebounded from each obstacle, winning a world title last June and making the national team again this winter.

The half-court basketball discipline was added to the Olympic program for the Tokyo Games. In less than a year, Barry became part of the nation’s core group.

Barry, 26, played at the College of Charleston and then the University of Florida. He’s dribbled professionally in Finland, the Czech Republic, China and Des Moines, appearing in 61 games for the NBA G League’s Iowa Wolves between the last two seasons.

Barry has yet to play an NBA game — unlike his Hall of Fame father, Rick, and half-brothers JonBrent and Drew — but he became the first Barry to win a championship in a USA jersey at the 2019 FIBA 3×3 World Cup. He would choose the title of Olympian over playing one NBA game.

“Being able to represent your country on the biggest stage is something you can’t pass up,” he said last month. “Obviously, the NBA is the best league in the world, and it’s an absolute dream to try and make that and achieve that, but the Olympics is a once-in-a-lifetime thing.”

Rick knows that well. Canyon’s mom, Lynn, may know it better.

She’s the one who first mentioned 3×3 to him last March. Lynn, whose jersey was retired by William & Mary, was an assistant director for the U.S. women’s national team through the 1988, 1992 and 1996 Olympics.

“When I was little, I would always be in the gym running around in practice while the Olympic team was practicing,” said Barry, who has a a physics degree and a master’s in nuclear engineering. “I just remember Lisa Leslie, Swin Cash, Sheryl Swoopes, all those amazing female players … Now to be a part of that USA Basketball program, it’s kind of come full circle.”

Last spring, Barry was one of many G League, NCAA and overseas players invited by USA Basketball to take part in a 3×3 training camp. Olympic 3×3’s roster regulations largely rule out the potential for NBA players. The federation was on the lookout for talent.

Barry’s team of G League players went 0-4 at the national championships in May, yet USA Basketball still picked him for the four-man World Cup roster.

“Canyon has been on USA Basketball’s radar since he was a younger player, because he was a fairly well-recognized player,” said Jay Demings, who oversees U.S. 3×3 and is part of the selection committee. “You would think a lot of what you would look for in a 5-on-5 player would translate perfectly to 3×3, but in fact, It requires a number of different skill sets that not everybody possesses, but I think Canyon does possess those skills that translate to success in 3×3.

“He’s obviously mobile. He has size in terms of height [listed at 6-6]. His length. He’s a strong, tough player. He defends well, but he can also handle the ball, and he can also score at the rim and outside. When you’re looking for a prototype player, you want players that not only play the game like Canyon but think the game like he does.”

For the World Cup, Barry was put on a U.S. team with Purdue star Robbie HummelKareem Maddox and Damon Huffman (who replaced G Leaguer Briante Weber).

Hummel, Maddox and Huffman had all stopped playing five-on-five and were part of Team Princeton, a group of players scattered around the country led by a 3×3 legend who famously beat Michael Jordan in one-on-one.

They were seeded seventh at the World Cup in Amsterdam, yet went undefeated to the U.S.’ first title. Serbia and Qatar combined to take the previous five.

Barry went back to Des Moines. In the fourth game of the G League season on Nov. 16, he broke a fibula contesting a three-pointer.

“Landed wrong, heard a snap,” he said. “Immediately you think the worst. ACL, something, knee. It was just a fibula [non-weight-bearing bone], clean break.”

Barry fortunately only missed two months. A month into his return, Barry joined other 3×3 players for a camp in Chicago during NBA All-Star Weekend to determine the roster for March’s Olympic qualifying tournament. Being named to the qualifying team wouldn’t guarantee a place on the Olympic team, but it bodes well.

Barry made it, again with Hummel and Maddox, plus Dominique Jones.

“We expected him to be a step behind,” because of the injury, said Demings, who told Barry he made the team at a breakfast, “but in fact he proved to be a step ahead.”

The qualifying tournament, slated for India this week, has been postponed due to the coronavirus outbreak. If Barry plays at an Olympics, he would be the first Barry to do so. But not the first Barry to attempt to make an Olympic team.

“The biggest disappointment in my career was not getting an opportunity to actually play in the Olympics,” said Barry’s father, the Golden State Warriors legend. He tried out for the previous Tokyo Olympics in 1964.

“It was a joke,” he said of the process. Rick asserted the 1964 Olympic team was largely decided before more than 90 players tried out from the NCAA, NAIA, AAU and the Armed Forces. He believes there was also a quota system determined beforehand to take a certain number of players from one or more of the groups.

The 12-man Olympic team ended up including five NCAA players (but not Rick Barry), six from the AAU and one from the NAIA. Bill Bradley and Larry Brown were among those who went on to take gold in Tokyo.

“My dad always says one of his biggest regrets of his career was never being able to be an Olympian,” Canyon Barry said.

A USA Basketball spokesperson said they weren’t aware of any officials who are still alive who were part of the selection process.

Rick Barry did play one exhibition for the U.S. against a Soviet team as a University of Miami senior, when he led the NCAA in scoring at 37.4 points per game.

“I don’t think I got to keep [the jersey],” he said, “but I was just proud to have it on.”

But he would rather talk about Canyon, whose world title last year was cause for celebration back home.

“He’s already done something that nobody’s ever done in our family,” Rick said.

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Why Charles Barkley elbowed an Angola player at the 1992 Olympics

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Charles Barkley was prophetic before the Dream Team’s first game at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics.

“I don’t know anything about Angola,” he said in a press conference, “but Angola’s in trouble.”

Two Angolans in particular. In a 116-48 showcase, Barkley shoved one player and elbowed another, drawing a technical foul for the latter that ended a 31-point U.S. run.

The elbow drew particular criticism and headlines referring to Barkley, and to some extent drawing in the rest of the Dream Team, as an Ugly American. It was the first Olympic game with NBA superstars. Aside from the expected blowout, it was not the first impression Americans had hoped for.

“We all tried to talk to him and say, hey, we still want to be liked,” Michael Jordan told NBC afterward. “That’s one of those moves that wasn’t quite smart. Hopefully we can get past that mistake.”

They of course did, steamrolling to gold to spark a new era for Olympic basketball.

But Barkley’s gesture endured, highlighted in Dream Team documentaries on NBA TV and NBC in 2012. Barkley continued to claim that the Angolan, 24-year-old economics student Herlander Coimbra, elbowed him three times before the Round Mound of Rebound had enough.

“That team played dirty,” Barkley, who had a 75-pound edge over Coimbra, said in the NBC film. “I said hey, dude, if you do that any more, I’m going to clock you. So he did it a couple more times, and I clocked him.”

To Barkley’s credit, he obliged to take a picture with Coimbra after the game, according to The New York Times, which reported that Angola had three gymnasiums in the entire country.

Still, U.S. Olympic Committee officials briefly considered sending Barkley home, according to Jack McCallum‘s book, “Dream Team.” They let Barkley stay in Barcelona, where he mingled regularly along Las Ramblas.

Barkley went on to lead the Dream Team in scoring as part of the greatest year of his career. He was also traded from the flailing Philadelphia 76ers to the Phoenix Suns that summer, then went on to win NBA MVP and reach the Finals, where the Jordan Bulls stopped him in six games.

He was one of four Dream Teamers to return for the 1996 Atlanta Games, winning another gold medal that he’s now planning to sell.

“Other players in Angola play against Charles Barkley, and they told us there’s like a kid, a fat boy who is very aggressive in the paint,” Coimbra said in the 2012 NBA TV documentary. “I think he acted like a bully, but maybe it’s his personality.”

Angola, though it has zero Olympic medals in any sport, actually qualified for five straight Olympic men’s basketball tournaments in the 1990s and 2000s and won games in 1992 and 1996.

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Charles Barkley plans to sell Olympic gold medal

Charles Barkley
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Charles Barkley said in multiple interviews that he will sell his 1996 Olympic gold medal among other memorabilia from his basketball career to help pay for 20 affordable houses he plans to build in his hometown of Leeds, Ala.

“I don’t think I have to walk around with my gold medal or my MVP trophy for people to know I’m Charles Barkley, so I’m going to sell all that crap,” Barkley said on the Dan Le Batard show last Thursday. “That just clutters my house. I used to keep it at my grandmother’s house, but they all passed away, and I don’t want that stuff crapping up my house.”

It looks like Barkley’s 1992 Olympic Dream Team gold medal will stay in the family, however. Barkley said his daughter wants to keep that one item.

“Because of how sentimental it is for the world,” he said in an Alabama radio interview Friday. “But all of that other stuff, man, is just an eyesore.”

Barkley said he was told his 1993 NBA MVP trophy could fetch at least $300,000 to $400,000 but didn’t give a specific estimate for the 1996 Olympic gold medal.

In 1992, Barkley led the Dream Team in scoring (18 points per game on 71 percent shooting) despite starting just half of the eight games. He also memorably elbowed an Angolan player in a 116-48 rout in the opener. The flagrant foul led to Angola hitting its one free throw during a 46-1 U.S. run.

“If he keeps this up, they’re going to throw him out of the Olympics,” Michael Jordan reportedly said after the game.

Barkley not only made it through Barcelona, but he also returned with four other Dream Teamers for the 1996 Atlanta Games. He averaged 12.4 points per game (on 82 percent shooting), playing seven of eight games, as the U.S. again went undefeated.

Barkley made another memory in Atlanta, throwing one of his shoes into the crowd.

Carmelo Anthony‘s 2004 Olympic bronze medal was reportedly auctioned in 2014 for $14,080.

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