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Adam Rippon leads Olympians in ESPN the Magazine Body Issue

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Figure skater Adam Rippon is among seven Olympians announced for the 10th edition of ESPN the Magazine‘s Body Issue.

Rippon, a team event bronze medalist, is joined by fellow PyeongChang Olympian Jessie Diggins (gold, cross-country skiing) and Summer Olympians Tori Bowie (track and field), Sue Bird and Breanna Stewart (basketball) and Megan Rapinoe and Crystal Dunn (Soccer),

Non-Olympian athletes include Saquon Barkley and Jerry Rice (football), Zlatan Ibrahimovic (soccer), Greg Norman (golf), Karl-Anthony Towns (basketball), Dallas Keuchel and Yasiel Puig (baseball), Lauren Chamberlain (softball) and Charlotte Flair (WWE).

Images will be published online Monday, and the magazine hits newsstands June 29, according to ESPN.

Past Olympians in the Body Issue include Serena Williams (on the first cover in 2009), Michael PhelpsKerri Walsh JenningsAly Raisman and Gus Kenworthy,

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MORE: Adam Rippon opines on figure skating future

Tonga flag bearer guarantees medal if he makes 2020 Olympics in new sport

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UNITED NATIONS — Pita Taufatofua is not ready to reveal which new sport he has taken up for a 2020 Olympic run — “very soon,” he said — but the oiled-up, shirtless Tongan flag bearer made it clear.

“I can guarantee you … whatever that next sport is, if I qualify for the Olympics in that sport, I will medal in that sport,” he said while visiting the UN last Wednesday for the Youth Dialogue event.

Taufatofua, who became a viral hit at the Rio Opening Ceremony and then competed in taekwondo and cross-country skiing in back-to-back Olympics, has known his new sport for at least two months. He traveled extensively since the Winter Games ended three months ago but found the time to tailor training for it.

“What I’m going to present is a sport that’s much more aligned with being a Tongan and being a Pacific Islander,” Taufatofua said two months ago. “It’s aligned with the water, the sea. So, wait and see.”

Yet Taufatofua refused to rule out competing in taekwondo again.

“Once taekwondo’s in the blood it never leaves,” he said Wednesday. “I’m always going to be a taekwondo fighter. Who knows? Who knows what the next step is.

“It’s always about stepping things up. How do you make it even better? Maybe I’ll do two sports. Who knows? … Whatever the most complex thing that I can think of is, that’ll be what’s next.”

Taufatofua also refused to rule out a team sport like water polo, despite Tonga having no Olympic history in the event and a minute chance to field a team to attempt to qualify for the Tokyo Games.

He also declined a suggestion that the new sport would be, like cross-country skiing, one with an easier route to qualify for the Olympics. Taufatofua finished 114th in his PyeongChang cross-country skiing race and lost by mercy rule in his Rio first-round taekwondo match.

“This is about the impossible,” Taufatofua said. “I’m not looking for an easy sport. I’m looking for a sport that’s aligned with me.”

Taufatofua confirmed he’s coming out with a book titled, “That Single Step,” based off the Lao Tzu quote, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”

“It’s going to change people’s lives when it comes to creating new habits, getting to exercise, becoming a sportsman,” he said.

When will Taufatofua compete again? He said he doesn’t know. But he has put all of the weight back on that he shed for cross-country skiing.

And if he’s able to carry the Tongan flag at a third Opening Ceremony, he will definitely be shirtless again, in a similar outfit to what he wore in Rio and PyeongChang.

“When I went to Rio, I was told by some of our own people [dignitaries], don’t wear this, don’t wear that,” Taufatofua said. “We want you to wear a suit and a tie. I said no. I said, you were taught to wear that suit and that tie 50 years ago. I said, my ancestors go back 1,000 years. I want to wear what they wore because I’m representing them when I carry that flag. They said no, so we carried it in our bags and hid it under our uniforms when we walked in the backstages of Rio and pulled it out when they had no chance to kick us off the team. Then, afterwards, they [other people] said, whose idea was it? They [the Tongan officials] said it was ours. It was all of ours.”

The PyeongChang uniform is headed for the Olympic Museum in Lausanne. The Rio one is stuck on his wall at home, hung with extra significance.

“It’s where things changed for me,” he said.

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‘Here Comes Diggins!’ now an ice cream flavor

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Selma’s Ice Cream Parlour in Olympic cross-country skiing gold medalist Jessie Diggins‘ hometown of Afton, Minn., unveiled a new flavor on Jessie Diggins Day on Saturday.

There could only be one name for the reported mix of strawberry, vanilla and blueberry (red, white and blue).

“From the moment we crossed the finish line, it was here comes Diggins, so that’s the name of the ice cream,” Diggins said on stage, referencing NBC Olympics’ Chad Salmela‘s memorable call from PyeongChang.

Local residents and Diggins fans gathered from noon to 5 p.m. in Town Square Park of the small city outside St. Paul to greet Diggins and see her gold medal, according to the St. Paul Pioneer Presswhich reported that a short section of St. Croix Trail in downtown Afton would also be named after the Olympic champ.

“This might be the first gold medal we’ve ever had,” Diggins said, “but I know it will not be the last.”

Diggins, 26, and 35-year-old Kikkan Randall earned the U.S.’ first Olympic cross-country skiing gold medal by edging powerhouse Sweden in the team sprint in PyeongChang.

Diggins honed her skills at Afton Alps, a large ski and snowboard area in Afton. She worked as a stock girl at nearby Slumberland Furniture, a company that went on to sponsor her skiing career.

In 2015, Diggins received golden “Skis to the City” at Afton’s annual Fourth of July parade, where she served as the Grand Marshal.

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MORE: Best cross-country skiing moments from PyeongChang Olympics