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Julie, Zach Ertz share what they learned from each other’s sports

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As Julie Ertz prepares for an Olympic year, and her husband a potential NFL playoff run, each can draw on the other’s experiences at the pinnacle of their sports.

Ertz and husband Zach, a Philadelphia Eagles tight end, discussed swapping training ideas, among other topics, on The Peter King Podcast.

The full 53-minute episode is here.

Ertz said she has grown to love watching match film after seeing Zach’s passion for studying.

“How important it is to pay attention to detail, even through route running,” she said on the podcast. “If somebody’s in the wrong spot, the whole play is kind of messed up. Every play is different, and in soccer it’s obviously a little bit more fluid, but it allowed me to stay more aware of where I am on the field.”

Zach said he was driven by training with Ertz, especially through core work. They’ve done yoga and Pilates together. Mentally, he can appreciate an athlete who trains for one or two major events every four years.

“The World Cup and the Olympics are what you’re going to be judged on as a player in her sport … it’s twice every four years, and so those two years you don’t have a quote-unquote big tournament, you can let your preparation lack if you really weren’t dedicated, if you weren’t fully invested,” he said. “But the way I see Julie train each and every day, she’s always training to be the best person she can be. She’s not training for the end result. She’s training for being a better player today than she was yesterday.”

Ertz, 27 and the 2017 U.S. Player of the Year, was part of World Cup title teams in 2015 and this past summer, but she doesn’t have an Olympic medal.

The U.S. was upset by Sweden in the quarterfinals in Rio. Ertz kept a photo from the match as a screen saver on her phone as a reminder of unfinished business.

“It was a horrible heartbreak that I’d never had before,” she said.

MORE: Rio Olympic women’s soccer champions fail to qualify for Tokyo

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Marquise Goodwin serious about NFL to Olympics run

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Marquise Goodwin, the San Francisco 49ers wide receiver, insists he wasn’t kidding when he proclaimed in April that he would win the 2020 Olympic long jump.

“Yes, 100 percent interest,” Goodwin said Tuesday. “But we’re talking about football right now. 2020 next year.”

Goodwin is already an Olympian, finishing 10th in the long jump at the 2012 London Games before his last season at the University of Texas. After two seasons with the Buffalo Bills, Goodwin went back to the track and failed in a Rio Olympic bid even though he had the world’s two farthest jumps that year going into the U.S. Olympic Trials.

Goodwin said he had “ceased competing” in track and field when he was suspended one year from April 1, 2017, for not updating drug-testing whereabouts forms. Goodwin stopped filling out the forms after going back to the NFL in 2016.

But now, at 28, he could look to become the oldest U.S. man to compete in an Olympic long jump since Carl Lewis won his record fourth straight gold at the 1996 Atlanta Games. His best long jump in 2016 — 8.45 meters — would rank first among Americans in this Olympic cycle.

However, Goodwin did not provide specifics Tuesday on when he would return to competition.

“It’s just offseason, same way I did it in high school, college, NFL,” he said. “Just make it happen. It’s all on my off time. I use it as part of my training. What I do in long jump, in track and field, definitely correlates with what I do as a wide receiver with being fast, being explosive, putting my foot down. It’s the same mechanics that I use in football.”

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MORE: Olympic shot put champion turned down NFL tryout

Usain Bolt having fun at Super Bowl, ‘ties’ NFL Combine 40-yard dash record

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As they sing in the song, “Anything you can do, I can do better.”

And it may just be the mantra for Jamaica’s eight-time Olympic gold medalist, and all-around showman, Usain Bolt. While attending the Super Bowl Experience in Atlanta, Bolt couldn’t resist toeing the line at the Combine Corner’s 40-yard dash challenge.

Bolt, wearing a T-shirt, track pants and a pair of flat-soled Pumas, casually crossed the finish line with the very unofficial time of 4.22 seconds. Bolt’s time “ties” the NFL Combine record set by John Ross in 2017.

So, about Tokyo 2020?